Online Discussion on Good Practice Initiatives in the Field of Prevention of Gender-based Violence in Sport

9 Jun '16 Thu 11:00 CET06/10/2016 12:00am EuroGender Online Discussion public Online Discussion on Good Practice Initiatives in the Field of Prevention of Gender-based Violence in Sport Europe/Vilnius 06/09/2016 12:00pm
9 Jun '16 Thu 23:00 CET
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Catarina Arnaut's picture

Good morning!

We are Lut Mergaert and Catarina Arnaut from Yellow Window, and Tine Vertommen from Thomas More University College. Together, we will be moderating this online discussion within the framework of the study on gender-based violence in sport commissioned by the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency. Thank you for your interest in discussing good practice initiatives in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport.

We would like to clarify that we will be online until 4 p.m. (Brussels time). We invite you to follow and participate in the discussion as much as you can. Still, if you lack time during the day, please be informed that the thread remains open for you to post comments for the rest of the day.

As you can see in the EuroGender event’s page, the topics to be discussed are numbered from 1 to 4 and will be addressed in this order. However, in case you wish to refer to a previous topic, feel free to do so by referring to the topic number.

We invite those of you who are online and those who will join throughout the day to share your experiences on prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport. We also encourage you to contribute to the identification of criteria to assess good practices in this field.

We are looking forward to interesting exchanges and to a fruitful discussion!

Catarina Arnaut's picture

During the national fieldwork of the present study, our researchers identified 41 promising practices in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport. Within this study, we defined:

Gender-based violence as “as violence directed against a person because of that person's gender (including gender identity/expression) or as violence that affects persons of a particular gender disproportionately” (European Commission’s definition provided in the Proposal for Strategic Actions on Gender Equality in Sport). Based on this definition, the study explicitly included homophobic violence.

Prevention as “measures to promote changes in the social and cultural patterns of behaviour of women and men of all ages. It includes, among others, awareness-raising initiatives, the development of educational materials, and the training of professionals”

Catarina Arnaut's picture

The preliminary criteria set forth to identify and select ‘promising practices’ in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport were:

Effectiveness: there is evidence that the practice has yielded positive effects. Ideally, the practice is being monitored or was evaluated. However, other evidences of effectiveness can be considered. These can be pointed out by the person responsible for the practice.

Transferability: the practice can be replicated elsewhere (i.e. the whole practice or some of its elements are transferable).

Learning value/potential: the practice contains elements that have learning value, or can be of inspiration for others.

Resilience: the practice can respond to resistance, and it can survive in challenging times and/or when funding ends.

Visibility of actions: the practice is designed in a way that speaks to different target groups and audiences; it is tailored taking into account its target group(s).

Catarina Arnaut's picture

The above were used as preliminary criteria for the selection of ‘promising practices’. Considering that good practices are sought to inspire and provide guidance to different stakeholders across the European Union, first of all, we would like to ask you whether you have comments or observations to make in relation to the preliminary criteria.

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

Hello everybody,

My name is Vilana.  

Catarina Arnaut

Hi Vilana! Welcome to the discussion! What are your views regarding the preliminary criteria?

Alexandrina Satnoianu's picture

Hello from Vilnius, 

Please allow me - on behalf of our Team - to welcome you to EIGE's main online consultation platform - EuroGender!

If you have have questions related to the platform or if you would like to organise online discussions yourselves, please contact us at: eurogender@eige.europa.eu.

We wish you a fruitful discussion!

Alexandrina 

Tine Vertommen's picture

Goodmorning everyone!

Based on my experiences as a national researcher in this project, I have to say it is very difficult to find practices that meet the criterion 'effectiveness'. For most of the practices, I could not find 'evidence' of the positive effects, as there were no effectiveness studies (including baseline measurements available) available. 

Does anybody has idea on how to assess the effectiveness of a practice, when there is no 'scientific evidence' available?

paola ottonello's picture

Hello everyone, I'm Paola Ottonello from the European Commission. I will be coming in and out today: look froward to a fruitful discussion

Catarina Arnaut

Thank you, Paola, for joining the discussion. We welcome your contributions according to your availability.

Sofia Strid's picture

Good morning, Sofia, working on the Swedish case here.

In relation to all of the criteria I think it is importnat to take the specific country context into account. I'm thinking in particular of how the problem of gender based violence is framed in national policy. Any best practice must, I think, reflect or tap into, the actual meaning of gender based violence in the country. Maybe this can be called "strategic framing" of teh best pracitce.

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

Hello everybody,

This is Ainhoa Azurmendi from Basque Country, Spain.

I am not really sure if I am in the correct place.. are you already discussing something? Or we have just started?

I won't be able to stay till 4pm, but I hope I can contribute.

Catarina Arnaut

Hi Ainhoa! Welcome! We are discussing our first topic: Qualitative criteria for selecting good practices in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport.
Our first question is related to any comments or observations you may have regarding the preliminary criteria we put forward for this study.

Kari Fasting's picture

Hello and good morning I am in, but I seem not to be able to go to the hyperlink on the different comments? 

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

It took me for a while to figure our how to reply and give a comment. 

I think that effectiveness could be measured only in a very long perspective because then it would be possible to measure. 

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

Hello,

I'm Montse from Barcelona-Catalonia-Spain

I found very interesting Tine's question. I'm not very fan of empirical evidence but I acknowledge that at the moment is what it works to convinve big institutions to provide change.

I'm more tha happy to start questioning efectivenes regarding Only to empririca evidence. Not sure I express myself correctly

Kari Fasting's picture

On the top of the page it says welcome Kari Fasting, but my name is not on the online users

Kari Fasting

Lut Mergaert's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid]

Good morning, Sofia, working on the Swedish case here.

In relation to all of the criteria I think it is importnat to take the specific country context into account. I'm thinking in particular of how the problem of gender based violence is framed in national policy. Any best practice must, I think, reflect or tap into, the actual meaning of gender based violence in the country. Maybe this can be called "strategic framing" of teh best pracitce.

[/quote]

Hi Sofia! :-)

Checking the strategic framing with the broader policy context and approach is indeed important. Would you add this as an additional criterion for good practices?

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen]

Goodmorning everyone!

Based on my experiences as a national researcher in this project, I have to say it is very difficult to find practices that meet the criterion 'effectiveness'. For most of the practices, I could not find 'evidence' of the positive effects, as there were no effectiveness studies (including baseline measurements available) available. 

Does anybody has idea on how to assess the effectiveness of a practice, when there is no 'scientific evidence' available?

[/quote]

Good morning everyone,

I am Rosa Diketmüller from Vienna;

for me it was also sometimes difficult to bring data/evidence for the criterion "effetiveness" for some of the practicesm, of which I am convinced that they are promising; sometimes just the fact that the practice is installed and visible, makes at least THE difference.

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert][quote=Sofia Strid]

Good morning, Sofia, working on the Swedish case here.

In relation to all of the criteria I think it is importnat to take the specific country context into account. I'm thinking in particular of how the problem of gender based violence is framed in national policy. Any best practice must, I think, reflect or tap into, the actual meaning of gender based violence in the country. Maybe this can be called "strategic framing" of teh best pracitce.

[/quote]

Hi Sofia! :-)

Checking the strategic framing with the broader policy context and approach is indeed important. Would you add this as an additional criterion for good practices?

[/quote]

Thanks Sofia and Lut!

I agree with you that a practice should link with available national policy (also outside sport) on GBV. But would that mean that a practice in a sport organisation, not linked with national policy, can't be a good practice?

Bakhallou Yassire 's picture

Hello everyone,

I’m Yassire Bakhallou, responsible for a national mission on the theme "Ethics and values of sport" from  the « Pôle Ressources national «Education, sport, mixity, citizenship» » is an organisme of the ministry of the city, of the Youth affairs and sports.

Lut Mergaert's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

On the top of the page it says welcome Kari Fasting, but my name is not on the online users

Kari Fasting

[/quote]

Hi Kari, nice to meet again here. Yes, we do see you among the online users. :-)

Renata Włoch's picture

Hi, here's Renata from University of Warsaw. 

Judging from the Polish context I would say that in some countries the most important factor of a good practice is visibility that is showing to the public and public institutions that there is a problem and something is being done with it. 

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

On the top of the page it says welcome Kari Fasting, but my name is not on the online users

Kari Fasting

[/quote]

Dear Kari,

You're in! We see your messages.

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

Hi everyone

Arne from the International Centre Ethics in Sport (ICES), Ghent, Belgium.

I fully agree with Sofia Strid's point on taking into account the national policy context, especially in a European-wide study like this. Maybe not as a separate criterion, but rather as a focus point within the transferability criterion.

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

I agree with Rosa. In Spain while doing the data collection I had the same problem. Was more about visibility and showing that something is been done than about the empirical efectiveness

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert][quote=Sofia Strid]

Good morning, Sofia, working on the Swedish case here.

In relation to all of the criteria I think it is importnat to take the specific country context into account. I'm thinking in particular of how the problem of gender based violence is framed in national policy. Any best practice must, I think, reflect or tap into, the actual meaning of gender based violence in the country. Maybe this can be called "strategic framing" of teh best pracitce.

[/quote]

Hi Sofia! :-)

Checking the strategic framing with the broader policy context and approach is indeed important. Would you add this as an additional criterion for good practices?

[/quote]

Morning Lut! :-)

Not sure if it's a criteria in its own right or an integrated issue, but I think the five critera would be better and more likely to lead to change (and will get passively reluctant national level actors onboard) if the policy contect is explicitly stated to be taken into account. 

Kari Fasting's picture

Tine

the only monitoring study I know about is from Canada. The article by Donnely, Kerr et al published on line some time ago, but I received it in print yesterday. they are among others looking at the system that each sport association should have a welfare officer, which was decided many years ago - and looking at how and if that functions today

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert][quote=Sofia Strid]

Good morning, Sofia, working on the Swedish case here.

In relation to all of the criteria I think it is importnat to take the specific country context into account. I'm thinking in particular of how the problem of gender based violence is framed in national policy. Any best practice must, I think, reflect or tap into, the actual meaning of gender based violence in the country. Maybe this can be called "strategic framing" of teh best pracitce.

[/quote]

Hi Sofia! :-)

Checking the strategic framing with the broader policy context and approach is indeed important. Would you add this as an additional criterion for good practices?

[/quote]

I would not add this as a separate criterion, but rather as a 'focus point' within the transferability criterion

Lut Mergaert's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch]

Hi, here's Renata from University of Warsaw. 

Judging from the Polish context I would say that in some countries the most important factor of a good practice is visibility that is showing to the public and public institutions that there is a problem and something is being done with it. 

[/quote]

thanks for this, Renata. Would that mean that criteria can be different according to the context/country? Or maybe that criteria can be given different weight or importance, according to context?

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch]

Hi, here's Renata from University of Warsaw. 

Judging from the Polish context I would say that in some countries the most important factor of a good practice is visibility that is showing to the public and public institutions that there is a problem and something is being done with it. 

[/quote]

Hi Renata, thanks for joining.

Just for clarification: do you think 'visibility' is the most important quality of a practice in your country, because of the taboo that is still on the topic of GBV in your country?

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I agree with Rosa. In Spain while doing the data collection I had the same problem. Was more about visibility and showing that something is been done than about the empirical efectiveness

[/quote]

Yes. The biggest problem I had during my research (also earlier research e.g. concerning homophobia in sport) was the attitude of the key actors that "there is no such thing" as violence in sport, not only gender-based, but in general, not to mention homophobia. 

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert][quote=Renata Włoch]

Hi, here's Renata from University of Warsaw. 

Judging from the Polish context I would say that in some countries the most important factor of a good practice is visibility that is showing to the public and public institutions that there is a problem and something is being done with it. 

[/quote]

thanks for this, Renata. Would that mean that criteria can be different according to the context/country? Or maybe that criteria can be given different weight or importance, according to context?

[/quote]

Well, I think that the criteria should be somehow differentiated. Other criteria should be used to evaluate good practices in countries where issues of gender in general or non-heteronormative issues in sport are more readily recognized. 

Bakhallou Yassire 's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch]

Hi, here's Renata from University of Warsaw. 

Judging from the Polish context I would say that in some countries the most important factor of a good practice is visibility that is showing to the public and public institutions that there is a problem and something is being done with it. 

[/quote]

Hello Renata,

I'm completely agree with you. Within the ministry of french sports, we try to make visible these excesses and we address these issues of discrimination through educational tools.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

The above were used as preliminary criteria for the selection of ‘promising practices’. Considering that good practices are sought to inspire and provide guidance to different stakeholders across the European Union, first of all, we would like to ask you whether you have comments or observations to make in relation to the preliminary criteria.

[/quote]

Hi everyone. Given the subjectivity of the meaning of GBV, across different regions and individuals, I feel that the “transferability” criterion, might be problematic unless this is underpinned by flexibility in terms of the utilisation of the practice in other contexts. 

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Renata Włoch]

Hi, here's Renata from University of Warsaw. 

Judging from the Polish context I would say that in some countries the most important factor of a good practice is visibility that is showing to the public and public institutions that there is a problem and something is being done with it. 

[/quote]

Hi Renata, thanks for joining.

Just for clarification: do you think 'visibility' is the most important quality of a practice in your country, because of the taboo that is still on the topic of GBV in your country?

[/quote]

Yes, that's it. 

I would put much emphasis on the fact that such practices as one undertaken by Campaign agains Homophoby were carried through at all. 

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Tine Vertommen]

Goodmorning everyone!

Based on my experiences as a national researcher in this project, I have to say it is very difficult to find practices that meet the criterion 'effectiveness'. For most of the practices, I could not find 'evidence' of the positive effects, as there were no effectiveness studies (including baseline measurements available) available. 

Does anybody has idea on how to assess the effectiveness of a practice, when there is no 'scientific evidence' available?

[/quote]

Good morning everyone,

I am Rosa Diketmüller from Vienna;

for me it was also sometimes difficult to bring data/evidence for the criterion "effetiveness" for some of the practicesm, of which I am convinced that they are promising; sometimes just the fact that the practice is installed and visible, makes at least THE difference.

[/quote]

I agree with you both in many points. I think it is different depending on the country, but at the same time I feel that it's all about the culture of planning and assesing public policies in each country. And to what extent we think about the way we are going to measure the efectiveness of an action when we are planning it.

On the other hand, some countries have already done research and mapped, and others have not even started.

Anyway, I think efectiveness has something to do with comparing same results later. While sport is reflection of society I feel it is really difficult to know (as Montse said) what afected change most.

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Tine Vertommen]

Goodmorning everyone!

Based on my experiences as a national researcher in this project, I have to say it is very difficult to find practices that meet the criterion 'effectiveness'. For most of the practices, I could not find 'evidence' of the positive effects, as there were no effectiveness studies (including baseline measurements available) available. 

Does anybody has idea on how to assess the effectiveness of a practice, when there is no 'scientific evidence' available?

[/quote]

Good morning everyone,

I am Rosa Diketmüller from Vienna;

for me it was also sometimes difficult to bring data/evidence for the criterion "effetiveness" for some of the practicesm, of which I am convinced that they are promising; sometimes just the fact that the practice is installed and visible, makes at least THE difference.

[/quote]

I agree that effectiveness is difficult to measure (correlation, causation etc). In some feminist organisations studies, effectiveness or "sucess" even, is measured by the level of resistance the proposed change is met with. 

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

I would say so, Visibility could be an important criteria. Specially for countries which are behind in GbV in sport. I mean in Spain is not even fully recognised, when we talk about gender and Sport with the institutions it's about getting budget to work on equal opportunities for boys and girls in sport. This means something... And GbV sounds something out of sport, because in our Lw the definitions is that GbV is between partners... all very confusing when I talked to them about the "possible" GbV in sport

Bakhallou Yassire 's picture

i've got a question for eveyone please : 

do you use educational tools to address issues related to discrimination ? if so, which ones and how ?

thank you

you use educational tools to address issues related to discrimination ? if so, which ones and how ?

Catarina Arnaut

Hello Bakhallou, we would like to give more attention to your question when we are discussing our next topic.
Do you have any views regarding criteria to assess good practices in this field?

Maurizio Bertollo's picture

Good morning everyone,

my colleague Maria Cristina Verrocchio, who has been involved in this project after the request to me by Ani Chroni to find someone in Italy who was expert in this field, asked me to joint in this online meeting. She is busy today and not able to attend. I helped her in data collection because I know very well the Italian sport setting and work in sport psychology field as both as professional and academics. However, I’m not an expert in this specific field of “Prevention of Gender-based Violence in Sport”. So I’ll try to follow he discussion being in and out due to my daily academic commitment.

I also see that I’m the only male. I hope not to be a rare bird :-)

Catarina Arnaut

Good morning, Maurizio! We look forwarding to reading your views. Although you do not consider yourself an expert on this matter, perhaps you have something to share about criteria to assess good practices. What do you think about the preliminary criteria used in this study?

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Bakhallou Yassire]

i've got a question for eveyone please : 

do you use educational tools to address issues related to discrimination ? if so, which ones and how ?

thank you

you use educational tools to address issues related to discrimination ? if so, which ones and how ?

[/quote]

Could you specify, please? I'm working at the University, so I surely use educational tools:) 

Zuzana Ocenasova's picture

Hallo everybody,

I have just signed in.

Zuzana from Slovakia

Catarina Arnaut

Welcome, Zuzana! Would you like to share your experience related to assessing promising practices and the criteria used?

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

Just to clarify ...

in my opinion, not having enough data for the criterion "effectiveness" should not mean to kick the practice out of the list of promising practices, in cases it is implemented, it is visible, it changes the mind and helps in the so important process of sensitisation,

but on the other hand, data on the effectiveness of practices would be very helpful for future and could support e.g. other countries to implement this measure/practice

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Tine Vertommen]

Goodmorning everyone!

Based on my experiences as a national researcher in this project, I have to say it is very difficult to find practices that meet the criterion 'effectiveness'. For most of the practices, I could not find 'evidence' of the positive effects, as there were no effectiveness studies (including baseline measurements available) available. 

Does anybody has idea on how to assess the effectiveness of a practice, when there is no 'scientific evidence' available?

[/quote]

Good morning everyone,

I am Rosa Diketmüller from Vienna;

for me it was also sometimes difficult to bring data/evidence for the criterion "effetiveness" for some of the practicesm, of which I am convinced that they are promising; sometimes just the fact that the practice is installed and visible, makes at least THE difference.

[/quote]

I agree that effectiveness is difficult to measure (correlation, causation etc). In some feminist organisations studies, effectiveness or "sucess" even, is measured by the level of resistance the proposed change is met with. 

[/quote]

I totally agree

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

Tine

the only monitoring study I know about is from Canada. The article by Donnely, Kerr et al published on line some time ago, but I received it in print yesterday. they are among others looking at the system that each sport association should have a welfare officer, which was decided many years ago - and looking at how and if that functions today

[/quote]

Hi Kari! Thanks for joining!

Is it this article you are talking about?

Donnelly, P., Kerr, G., Heron, A., & DiCarlo, D. (2014). Protecting youth in sport: an examination of harassment policiesInternational Journal of Sport Policy and Politics  DOI:10.1080/19406940.2014.958180  

Francesca Vitali's picture

Good morning to all of you! :-)

It has been a pleasure to receive this kind invitation.

I hope this network will constantly grow and consolidate, who will be able to translate ideas into operational projets.

As sport psychologist, I am personally very interested in research and education projects on preventing gender violence in sport.

Good job everyone!
 

Catarina Arnaut

Hello, Francesca! Do you have any views regarding the criteria we are currently discussing?

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

[quote=Maurizio Bertollo]

Good morning everyone,

my colleague Maria Cristina Verrocchio, who has been involved in this project after the request to me by Ani Chroni to find someone in Italy who was expert in this field, asked me to joint in this online meeting. She is busy today and not able to attend. I helped her in data collection because I know very well the Italian sport setting and work in sport psychology field as both as professional and academics. However, I’m not an expert in this specific field of “Prevention of Gender-based Violence in Sport”. So I’ll try to follow he discussion being in and out due to my daily academic commitment.

I also see that I’m the only male. I hope not to be a rare bird :-)

[/quote]

I am male too :)

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I would say so, Visibility could be an important criteria. Specially for countries which are behind in GbV in sport. I mean in Spain is not even fully recognised, when we talk about gender and Sport with the institutions it's about getting budget to work on equal opportunities for boys and girls in sport. This means something... And GbV sounds something out of sport, because in our Lw the definitions is that GbV is between partners... all very confusing when I talked to them about the "possible" GbV in sport

[/quote]

That's true. But I would say that it is a good point that they have started asking for a protocol against GbV to all sports federations as compulsory for receiveing a subsidy.

Now, the problem is that I don't feel they're not enough qualified to design and develop it because from my point of view, one of the handicaps of many sports organizations is that they are not aware about gender inequalities. And to see and recognize this is essential.

Kari Fasting's picture

No, I will try to find it and send it. It's in my office, and I am not there now. But I probably can find it on the net

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

dear friends we canb't follow you in the on line discussion. How to connect?

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I agree with Rosa. In Spain while doing the data collection I had the same problem. Was more about visibility and showing that something is been done than about the empirical efectiveness

[/quote]

Yes. The biggest problem I had during my research (also earlier research e.g. concerning homophobia in sport) was the attitude of the key actors that "there is no such thing" as violence in sport, not only gender-based, but in general, not to mention homophobia. 

[/quote]

In Cyprus, while the problem is made visible and recognisable through media, there is very little (would say none) clear, context-sensitive guidelines and education at practitioner levels. This approach creates uncertaincy and ambiguity at practitioner levels. 

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

sorry, but it takes time with the answers. I would support arguments about the visibility, but the context matters. In Lithuania visibility is necessary at this moment because the problem is absolutely hidden. But the probelm is that when the gendered aspects are ignored the forms to raise visibility shoudl be very well  selected in order to make a positive impact 

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Kari Fasting]

Tine

the only monitoring study I know about is from Canada. The article by Donnely, Kerr et al published on line some time ago, but I received it in print yesterday. they are among others looking at the system that each sport association should have a welfare officer, which was decided many years ago - and looking at how and if that functions today

[/quote]

Hi Kari! Thanks for joining!

Is it this article you are talking about?

Donnelly, P., Kerr, G., Heron, A., & DiCarlo, D. (2014). Protecting youth in sport: an examination of harassment policiesInternational Journal of Sport Policy and Politics  DOI:10.1080/19406940.2014.958180  

[/quote]

Thats great! Thanks for sharing

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I would say so, Visibility could be an important criteria. Specially for countries which are behind in GbV in sport. I mean in Spain is not even fully recognised, when we talk about gender and Sport with the institutions it's about getting budget to work on equal opportunities for boys and girls in sport. This means something... And GbV sounds something out of sport, because in our Lw the definitions is that GbV is between partners... all very confusing when I talked to them about the "possible" GbV in sport

[/quote]

That's true. But I would say that it is a good point that they have started asking for a protocol against GbV to all sports federations as compulsory for receiveing a subsidy.

Now, the problem is that I don't feel they're not enough qualified to design and develop it because from my point of view, one of the handicaps of many sports organizations is that they are not aware about gender inequalities. And to see and recognize this is essential.

[/quote]

The protocols are important, but, again, from my research experience, they remain on paper if sport organizations stick to their opinion that there is no (gender-based) violence in sport, as they have no cases/incidents registered. 

For me, it is a clear case of the need for more engaged research and results that will serve as a proof against those institutional denials. 

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Raffaella chiodo]

dear friends we canb't follow you in the on line discussion. How to connect?

[/quote]

Dear Raffaella

Welcome! What do you mean? You are online and joining the discussion, so you should be able to read all contributions here. Please let us know if it doesn't work.

Zuzana Ocenasova's picture

[quote=Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I would say so, Visibility could be an important criteria. Specially for countries which are behind in GbV in sport. I mean in Spain is not even fully recognised, when we talk about gender and Sport with the institutions it's about getting budget to work on equal opportunities for boys and girls in sport. This means something... And GbV sounds something out of sport, because in our Lw the definitions is that GbV is between partners... all very confusing when I talked to them about the "possible" GbV in sport

[/quote]

That's true. But I would say that it is a good point that they have started asking for a protocol against GbV to all sports federations as compulsory for receiveing a subsidy.

Now, the problem is that I don't feel they're not enough qualified to design and develop it because from my point of view, one of the handicaps of many sports organizations is that they are not aware about gender inequalities. And to see and recognize this is essential.

[/quote]

I also agree that visibility is an important criteria particularly for countries in which GBV in sports is not fully recognized. I had similar experience as in Spain. Taking into acount that GBV in sports is rarely part of national policies (at least in some countries), visibility of the issue and admitting that it can happend within the sport context is an important first step how to tackle it.

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

We should take into account the difference between 'visibility of a practice' and 'visibility of a topic' in a national context. Here I think, the visibility criterion should only be looking at the first. The second - visibility of the GBV-topic - is part of the effectiveness criterion specifically with 'awereness-raising practices'.

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

similarly, in Lithuania no violence is "seen", it is a general accepted behaviour of coaches that they have to be strict and harsh in order to discipline the athlets and make them achieve the best results. It seems that any means are justified

Maurizio Bertollo's picture

[quote=Francesca Vitali]

Good morning to all of you! :-)

It has been a pleasure to receive this kind invitation.

I hope this network will constantly grow and consolidate, who will be able to translate ideas into operational projets.

As sport psychologist, I am personally very interested in research and education projects on preventing gender violence in sport.

Good job everyone!
 

[/quote]

Very nice that you were able to join at the end Francesca as indicated with Maria Cristina in the report. Thank you. So I can go out the room without any problem.

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

Good Vilana,

fighting against it every single day with my students and it's very fustrating they don't see it. The hash and the intimidation always needed to excel in sport, otherwise you are a puff.

Catarina Arnaut's picture

All your remarks regarding initiatives that need to be implemented are very pertinent. Visibility of actions are indeed crucial to raise awareness on the topic. This is something we would like to discuss later today.

Now, we would like to focus on criteria to assess good practices.

Sofia Strid's picture

Re critera for best practice and effectiveness:
I'm sorry if I'm repeating what someone else has already said, but it could be worth discussing/thinking about including monitoring/evaluation in the critera, that is, a best practice should include some stated targets which can be monitored, evalutated, or "measured" if you will. 

Irina Costache's picture

Hello everyone,

My name is Irina Costache I am from Romania, an expert on gender based violence and a sports fan. Many years ago I happened to write about women's sports. Now I am only involved in managing some cases of gender based violence in sports - victims' support.

I love the theme of the study and I am glad EIGE has gotten involved in this topic.  There is for sure a need in Romania to engage the field of sports with issues of GBV. Hope to be of use to this conversation.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic]

sorry, but it takes time with the answers. I would support arguments about the visibility, but the context matters. In Lithuania visibility is necessary at this moment because the problem is absolutely hidden. But the probelm is that when the gendered aspects are ignored the forms to raise visibility shoudl be very well  selected in order to make a positive impact 

[/quote]

I aggree with this thought. Giving visibility to a practice (i.e. an awareness raising campaign), in order to create new discourse, while essential has to be made in a very careful manner taking into consideration the context-specific reluctances and particular cultures (particularly that of sport...i.e. male dominated, highly competitive, gender stereotypes, uniqueness of relationships). 

Kari Fasting's picture

Hi

I wonder what you mean by visibility? Is it the fact that media focus on it, that you when you did the data gathering made it visible for the people you interviewed?

I agree that focus on GBV in one or another form may be important in countries where it is a non-issue. But very often politicians in and outside sport with ask for numbers.

Studies from sexual harasment in the workplace shows that the number of incidents seems to go down even when the  place only get a policy in place which also can be seen as one form of visibility

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I would say so, Visibility could be an important criteria. Specially for countries which are behind in GbV in sport. I mean in Spain is not even fully recognised, when we talk about gender and Sport with the institutions it's about getting budget to work on equal opportunities for boys and girls in sport. This means something... And GbV sounds something out of sport, because in our Lw the definitions is that GbV is between partners... all very confusing when I talked to them about the "possible" GbV in sport

[/quote]

Hi Montse, good to meet you here!

I understand. So with visibility, you also mean 'clarity' on the definition of GbV?

Pambos Demetriades's picture

Hello from Cyprus Sport Organisation

General Sports Federation Austria's picture

Hello from Vienna and thank you for the invitation! I just signed in and cannot stay here very long but I'm very interested to read about your statements, thank you!

Kind regards

Barbara

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

Another criteria could be how the visibility actions has spread amongst the clubs. We still don't know how effective the action -good practice is, but we can have an idea of how many clubs or federations have joined the visible action throughout the years.

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

I think for us still clearfe to talk about sexual harassament and abuse in sport, or even sexual violence in sport (which include children and youth) than GbV in sport. Due to our laws in domestic violence, no more call like this, but means this mainly.

Catarina Arnaut's picture

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

Maurizio Bertollo's picture

[quote=International Centre Ethics in Sport][quote=Maurizio Bertollo]

Good morning everyone,

my colleague Maria Cristina Verrocchio, who has been involved in this project after the request to me by Ani Chroni to find someone in Italy who was expert in this field, asked me to joint in this online meeting. She is busy today and not able to attend. I helped her in data collection because I know very well the Italian sport setting and work in sport psychology field as both as professional and academics. However, I’m not an expert in this specific field of “Prevention of Gender-based Violence in Sport”. So I’ll try to follow he discussion being in and out due to my daily academic commitment.

I also see that I’m the only male. I hope not to be a rare bird :-)

[/quote]

I am male too :)

[/quote]

:-)

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid]

Re critera for best practice and effectiveness:
I'm sorry if I'm repeating what someone else has already said, but it could be worth discussing/thinking about including monitoring/evaluation in the critera, that is, a best practice should include some stated targets which can be monitored, evalutated, or "measured" if you will. 

[/quote]

There is the European project BIS (Balance in Sport) going on to elaborate and implement indicators for assessing gender equality in European sport - if I understood it right, the issue of GBV is discussed there as one aspect beside others (coaches, officials, media);

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

Studies from sexual harasment in the workplace shows that the number of incidents seems to go down even when the  place only get a policy in place which also can be seen as one form of visibility

[/quote]

This is a very interesting point. Would it be possible to share some references on this?

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

I would say so, Visibility could be an important criteria. Specially for countries which are behind in GbV in sport. I mean in Spain is not even fully recognised, when we talk about gender and Sport with the institutions it's about getting budget to work on equal opportunities for boys and girls in sport. This means something... And GbV sounds something out of sport, because in our Lw the definitions is that GbV is between partners... all very confusing when I talked to them about the "possible" GbV in sport

[/quote]

That's true. But I would say that it is a good point that they have started asking for a protocol against GbV to all sports federations as compulsory for receiveing a subsidy.

Now, the problem is that I don't feel they're not enough qualified to design and develop it because from my point of view, one of the handicaps of many sports organizations is that they are not aware about gender inequalities. And to see and recognize this is essential.

[/quote]

The protocols are important, but, again, from my research experience, they remain on paper if sport organizations stick to their opinion that there is no (gender-based) violence in sport, as they have no cases/incidents registered. 

For me, it is a clear case of the need for more engaged research and results that will serve as a proof against those institutional denials. 

[/quote]

Absolutely. I think that protocols make no sense if there isn't an overall policy in equality in sports.

Maurizio Bertollo's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller]

Just to clarify ...

in my opinion, not having enough data for the criterion "effectiveness" should not mean to kick the practice out of the list of promising practices, in cases it is implemented, it is visible, it changes the mind and helps in the so important process of sensitisation,

but on the other hand, data on the effectiveness of practices would be very helpful for future and could support e.g. other countries to implement this measure/practice

[/quote]

We could think about a more general criterium that could be impact, which can include effectiveness and visibility

Kadri Aavik's picture

Hello everyone,

I'm Kadri Aavik from Estonia and I was happy to be part of this project, collecting data on gender-based violence in sports in Estonia. Unfortunately there seem to be no best practices or measures to deal with and prevent gender-based violence in sports in Estonia. I was surprised to learn that relevant stakeholders do not think gender-based violence in sports is a problem that requires any special measures to be devised and implemented.  

Maurizio Bertollo's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

The preliminary criteria set forth to identify and select ‘promising practices’ in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport were:

Effectiveness: there is evidence that the practice has yielded positive effects. Ideally, the practice is being monitored or was evaluated. However, other evidences of effectiveness can be considered. These can be pointed out by the person responsible for the practice.

Transferability: the practice can be replicated elsewhere (i.e. the whole practice or some of its elements are transferable).

Learning value/potential: the practice contains elements that have learning value, or can be of inspiration for others.

Resilience: the practice can respond to resistance, and it can survive in challenging times and/or when funding ends.

Visibility of actions: the practice is designed in a way that speaks to different target groups and audiences; it is tailored taking into account its target group(s).

[/quote]

I have already discussed with my colleague Maria Cristina about the criterium and they are fine for us. 

Kari Fasting's picture

I think there are some references in Margart S. Stockdale 1996. Sexual Harasssment in the Workplace. Perspectives, Frontiers, and Response Strategies Sage Publications. I have to check some of my earlier oublications

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

I think there are some references in Margart S. Stockdale 1996. Sexual Harasssment in the Workplace. Perspectives, Frontiers, and Response Strategies Sage Publications. I have to check some of my earlier oublications

[/quote]

thanks!

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

[/quote]

Hi Catarina, I agree with your thoughts on these two criteria. Overall, reflecting on the suggested criteria, I would suggest that another criterion, that could be added when assessing a practice, could be the national (contextually sensitive) nature of a practice. 

Francesca Vitali's picture

Regarding the criteria, the only views I have are the following:

- educative interventions should be culturally based: I think we should discuss to share an intercultural framework to adress studies/interventions for preventing GBV in sport

- efficacy of educative interventions for preventing GBV in sport should be evaluated using valid parameters (not only quantitative but also qualitative)

Kari Fasting's picture

The term effectiveness; you probably have discussed the word/concept. but I wonder if it is better to use positive impacts or led to any change. Effectiveness sounds very much like a hard science concept to me.Generally I think the criteria are good, though they are open for interpretation, but I think it will always be like that -- I like that they to a certain degree are defined and/or explained

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

[/quote]

Hi Catarina, I agree with your thoughts on these two criteria. Overall, reflecting on the suggested criteria, I would suggest that another criterion, that could be added when assessing a practice, could be the national (contextually sensitive) nature of a practice. 

[/quote]

Thanks Maria (happy to meet you here)!

I understand. I was wondering: how could a criterion on 'context/nature' could be operationalized?

Maybe 'context' can be seen as a subcriterion of 'transferability'? I think, before assessing the transferability of a practice, one should always study the context in which the practice is currently implemented. Would you agree?

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

I agree with Kari I would add at the end but Not determined

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

From my point of view, there is another key question to be taken into account: violence against women or GbV. I know that this project includes men and women, but to design and implement policies it is not the same if we tackle this issue as a structural problem in society (women's situation) or as a whole (men, women, youth, girls, boys...). And this will be really different from one country to another. Maybe the ones with more experience in equality policies can adress it more generaly, but some other countries are still swimming in machismo.

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

we always need them to be open for interpretation, readjustment and contextualisation...

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

Yes, Maria,

Aboslutely agree that context matters all the time. transferability is possible if context is ready to approve, but I think adaptation of any best practice of other countries is needed

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

[/quote]

Hi Catarina, I agree with your thoughts on these two criteria. Overall, reflecting on the suggested criteria, I would suggest that another criterion, that could be added when assessing a practice, could be the national (contextually sensitive) nature of a practice. 

[/quote]

In general I feel that the criteria for assessment of a practice, could be found based on qualitative rather quantitative 'language'. This said, a qualitative criterion, to assess a practice, could be its preventative nature i.e. to what extent it is implemented proactively and in order that it would prevent GBV to take place in sport? To what extent a practice gives opportunities for reflection to sport individuals?

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

Hi all

Im Sally Proudlove from the UK's Shild Protection in Sport unit just joining the discussion

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

Hi all

Im Sally Proudlove from the UK's Shild Protection in Sport unit just joining the discussion

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

Sorry Child not Shild!

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

The term effectiveness; you probably have discussed the word/concept. but I wonder if it is better to use positive impacts or led to any change. Effectiveness sounds very much like a hard science concept to me.Generally I think the criteria are good, though they are open for interpretation, but I think it will always be like that -- I like that they to a certain degree are defined and/or explained

[/quote]

I agree. I would also rather use impact than effectiveness. 

Also, i wonder if it's advisable and possible to construct a kind of an index of "recognition of the issue" in each country (not necessarilly quantitative), and then evaluate the practice in the context, to gain some comparative value. 

Melanie Lang's picture

Hi all. Sorry to join you slightly late but I had a few problems logging in. I'm trying and catch up with the discussion so far. Sally Proudlove from the Child protection in Sport Unit here in the UK is also struggling to log on though she can see comments.

Catarina Arnaut

Hi Mel! Sorry for these technical issues. We hope you can catch up and provide your valuable input. The same for Sally.

Lut Mergaert's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

The term effectiveness; you probably have discussed the word/concept. but I wonder if it is better to use positive impacts or led to any change. Effectiveness sounds very much like a hard science concept to me.Generally I think the criteria are good, though they are open for interpretation, but I think it will always be like that -- I like that they to a certain degree are defined and/or explained

[/quote]

'Effectiveness' as a criterion assesses whether the logics of your intervention were valid and the extent to which you managed to realise the objectives you pursued with the action(s) you set up. So outcomes are tested in relation to objectives and the steps taken to reach these. While 'impacts' consider what has been realised (intended and unintended effects), not immediately linking back to your intervention strategy and rationale. So, for assessing the adequacy of one or the other approach, I believe that considering 'effectiveness' remains important. But of course that does not mean that 'impacts' more generally are unimportant.

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Hi all

Im Sally Proudlove from the UK's Child Protection in Sport unit just joining the discussion

[/quote]

Hi Sally

Thanks for joining the discussion! I'm happy you're here.

Sally, what are your views on the preliminary criteria we suggested, and the extra criteria that have been suggested so far?

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

I disagree with Lut I prefer impact, or at least in the Spanish context would help more to have impact in mind, maybe just a phase, but we might need it before jumping into efectiveness.

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

During the national fieldwork of the present study, our researchers identified 41 promising practices in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport. Within this study, we defined:

Gender-based violence as “as violence directed against a person because of that person's gender (including gender identity/expression) or as violence that affects persons of a particular gender disproportionately” (European Commission’s definition provided in the Proposal for Strategic Actions on Gender Equality in Sport). Based on this definition, the study explicitly included homophobic violence.

Prevention as “measures to promote changes in the social and cultural patterns of behaviour of women and men of all ages. It includes, among others, awareness-raising initiatives, the development of educational materials, and the training of professionals”

[/quote]

ciao everybody !

we are Manuela and Raffaella from Italy from UISP sport for all organisation.

We are following the discussion and would like to ask you what kind of promising practice you have in mind. The reason we ask is because we use to work and analise the effectiveness in the continuity of the processes and long term.

Catarina Arnaut

Ciao Manuela and Raffaella! Welcome! Based on the criteria we have been discussing now, we already identified a number of promising practices. We included the abstracts of these practices in the background note posted on the discussion's page.

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang]

Hi all. Sorry to join you slightly late but I had a few problems logging in. I'm trying and catch up with the discussion so far. Sally Proudlove from the Child protection in Sport Unit here in the UK is also struggling to log on though she can see comments.

[/quote]

Good morning Mel

You're there now - great! Sally's and your contribution are visible here, so it seems you're both doing fine now.

Welcome!

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

[/quote]

Hi Catarina, I agree with your thoughts on these two criteria. Overall, reflecting on the suggested criteria, I would suggest that another criterion, that could be added when assessing a practice, could be the national (contextually sensitive) nature of a practice. 

[/quote]

Thanks Maria (happy to meet you here)!

I understand. I was wondering: how could a criterion on 'context/nature' could be operationalized?

Maybe 'context' can be seen as a subcriterion of 'transferability'? I think, before assessing the transferability of a practice, one should always study the context in which the practice is currently implemented. Would you agree?

[/quote]

I think that this is important. But for example, when we designed the guideline to prevent sexual harassment and abuse in sport (Basque Government, Spain), we took the attitudes and behaviours that had already been identified in other countries. And then, we corroborated them with sportswomen (group sessions), to see if they were out of our context or if we could keep them in. And this helped us in that transsferability.

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

Weve found it very hard to support organisations to authentically measure the impact of GBV work. One of the things that is often absent is the view of the women themselves who are mean to be the beneficiaries of the work. We focua specifically on children in our work and that can add another level of complexity in finding out their views, whether GBV initiatives have had an actual impact on their experiences ect. Often organisations decide not to talk to children at all because thye dont know how to gather qualitative information from them effectively to their voices are lost. So one important measure is what impact are any interventions catually having on the qualitative experience children or women are haing of sport?

International Centre Ethics in Sport's picture

Unfortunately, I already have to leave the discussion for today. I am happy to receive the transcript after the end of the discussion. We will keep in touch, good luck and have fruitful talks!

Best wishes

Arne

Catarina Arnaut

Dear Arne, thank you for your contributions. It is a pity you have to leave now. Please note that the discussion will remain open today until 23h59. Feel free to come back later and provide further feedback. Bye and we'll be in touch!

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Other potential criteria:

- inclusiveness/diversity: the suggested critera are all about form/structure, rather than content. Do we want to propose some basics on content? 

Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray's picture

[quote=Ainhoa Azurmendi Echegaray][quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

[/quote]

Hi Catarina, I agree with your thoughts on these two criteria. Overall, reflecting on the suggested criteria, I would suggest that another criterion, that could be added when assessing a practice, could be the national (contextually sensitive) nature of a practice. 

[/quote]

Thanks Maria (happy to meet you here)!

I understand. I was wondering: how could a criterion on 'context/nature' could be operationalized?

Maybe 'context' can be seen as a subcriterion of 'transferability'? I think, before assessing the transferability of a practice, one should always study the context in which the practice is currently implemented. Would you agree?

[/quote]

I think that this is important. But for example, when we designed the guideline to prevent sexual harassment and abuse in sport (Basque Government, Spain), we took the attitudes and behaviours that had already been identified in other countries. And then, we corroborated them with sportswomen (group sessions), to see if they were out of our context or if we could keep them in. And this helped us in that transsferability.

[/quote]

I think there are quite goog tools that can/should be adapted before designing a practice in each country. Anyway, I insist that I see that sport agents in general are far from identifying a problem. Education and training is fundamental.

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Weve found it very hard to support organisations to authentically measure the impact of GBV work. One of the things that is often absent is the view of the women themselves who are mean to be the beneficiaries of the work. We focua specifically on children in our work and that can add another level of complexity in finding out their views, whether GBV initiatives have had an actual impact on their experiences ect. Often organisations decide not to talk to children at all because thye dont know how to gather qualitative information from them effectively to their voices are lost. So one important measure is what impact are any interventions catually having on the qualitative experience children or women are haing of sport?

[/quote]

I agree with Sally - it's a real challenge to authentically measure the 'impact' of any GBV work. sound empirical magnitude studies have to be part of the starting point otherwise it's harder still to identify if/what has changed. but qualitative work is crucial as well as quantitative measurements, though organisations often don't understand it or prefer statistics because they're quicker to generate! 

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut] 

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

[/quote]

I see, Renata.

Maybe: collaborative partnerships?

[/quote]

Yees... but such partnership that is bent on engaging those actors who are both important and quite unwilling to admit that there is a problem. Closely linked with awareness raising activity in public actors.

So in such a criterium I would be less interested in emphasising the importance of all collaborative partnership e.g. with other NGOs or similar institutions, more with those institutions that are able to introduce a meaningful change, although they still do not recognize the meaning of the change:)

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

Very enlighting what Sally is suggesting. I was thinking also about talking to the people particcipating in the good practice and seen what "impact" ha sin their life, thoughts, everyday luve, converstions with friends in and out of sport... Maybe a more rigurous track of the people who participate in the GP and the people who benefits... Just thoughts... ;-)

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

For instance, some of you said that 'visibility' and 'effectiveness' are important criteria.

However, when it comes to 'effectiveness', it is very challenging to assess such criterion because evaluations are not planned or are not institutionalised in organisations. Moreover, it is difficult to collect evidence about change - also because change takes time.

Another issue raised is related to the broader national policy context. Depending on the context or when gender equality is taken for granted, giving visibility in itself can be an achievement. 

[/quote]

Hi Catarina, I agree with your thoughts on these two criteria. Overall, reflecting on the suggested criteria, I would suggest that another criterion, that could be added when assessing a practice, could be the national (contextually sensitive) nature of a practice. 

[/quote]

Thanks Maria (happy to meet you here)!

I understand. I was wondering: how could a criterion on 'context/nature' could be operationalized?

Maybe 'context' can be seen as a subcriterion of 'transferability'? I think, before assessing the transferability of a practice, one should always study the context in which the practice is currently implemented. Would you agree?

[/quote]

Hi Tine, nice to meet you here again! :) I like your suggestion. Perhaps, a good awareness of the context (i.e country, specific sport etc) could comprise a prerequisite for making a decision on whether a practice could be implemented elsewhere. For example, the commonalities shared between greece and cyprus (or team sports) would make a positive reason why a practice would be transferable elsewhere. However, I was thinking of the criterion of the context to function slightly differently. Particularly, this relates to the place where the practice is actually in place. For example, I would assess whether i.e. an action plan practice set in Cyprus is really responding to the needs of people at the practice levels. The question is how would I gather this information....? Perhaps through exploring the views of practitioners...Thats a challenging task though!

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

[/quote]

building up networks and collaborations  ...
as I ve realised in the work in Austria on this issue, this was a main key and resource, which at least made it possible to put (common) pressure on politics to start visibly working on this issue, which supported and empowered those people in the network staying working on this issue and being strong enough to deal with resistance

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

[/quote]

good point Renata - i agree engaging those in charge of sport is essential. i think many still do not recognise the problem though, or it's magnitude.

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

In terms of getting organisations to adopt measures we found until there was a clewar relationahip between demonstrating a level of good practice or at least a committment towards it and the national funding that organisations recieve, the extent to whihc organisations 'bought into' GBV measures was limited.Once they could see the benefits to them as an organisation there was more motivation to engage.

Zuzana Ocenasova's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Other potential criteria:

- inclusiveness/diversity: the suggested critera are all about form/structure, rather than content. Do we want to propose some basics on content? 

[/quote]

I think that previous discussion about the definition of GBV in sports is closely related to content specific criteria.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

[/quote]

good point Renata - i agree engaging those in charge of sport is essential. i think many still do not recognise the problem though, or it's magnitude.

[/quote]

Since the current project pays particular attention to children in relation to GBV an additional criterion would be the inclusion of children in the preparation/participation/ implementation/ of the practice?

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

[/quote]

good point Renata - i agree engaging those in charge of sport is essential. i think many still do not recognise the problem though, or it's magnitude.

[/quote]

Since the current project pays particular attention to children in relation to GBV an additional criterion would be the inclusion of children in the preparation/participation/ implementation/ of the practice?

[/quote]

definitely yes maria - including children's voices (as well as other target groups) should be somewhere in the criteria.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Weve found it very hard to support organisations to authentically measure the impact of GBV work. One of the things that is often absent is the view of the women themselves who are mean to be the beneficiaries of the work. We focua specifically on children in our work and that can add another level of complexity in finding out their views, whether GBV initiatives have had an actual impact on their experiences ect. Often organisations decide not to talk to children at all because thye dont know how to gather qualitative information from them effectively to their voices are lost. So one important measure is what impact are any interventions catually having on the qualitative experience children or women are haing of sport?

[/quote]

I agree with Sally - it's a real challenge to authentically measure the 'impact' of any GBV work. sound empirical magnitude studies have to be part of the starting point otherwise it's harder still to identify if/what has changed. but qualitative work is crucial as well as quantitative measurements, though organisations often don't understand it or prefer statistics because they're quicker to generate! 

[/quote]

Hi Mel and Sally, I agree with your thoughts which add to my comment below on the criteria that could be suggested for a practice to be good: " Since the current project pays particular attention to children in relation to GBV an additional criterion would be the inclusion of children in the preparation/participation/ implementation/ of the practice"?

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

I agree that should be included

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

But then there is an ethical problem to interview chidlren and bring their voices. I would not suggest that children;s voices should not be inlcuded, oppositely, they have to be heard, but the issues of how to interview them and so forth should be takne into consideration

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture
Kari Fasting wrote:

The term effectiveness; you probably have discussed the word/concept. but I wonder if it is better to use positive impacts or led to any change. Effectiveness sounds very much like a hard science concept to me.Generally I think the criteria are good, though they are open for interpretation, but I think it will always be like that -- I like that they to a certain degree are defined and/or explained.

I wonder if we could talk instead of "effectiveness," we could talk in terms of "affectiveness." It is just a letter difference, but I think it could be important.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic]

But then there is an ethical problem to interview chidlren and bring their voices. I would not suggest that children;s voices should not be inlcuded, oppositely, they have to be heard, but the issues of how to interview them and so forth should be takne into consideration

[/quote]

Of course. Children's agency should be brought to the front. Qualitative child-friendly methodologies can help us I guess. If only political support (and funding) will be available!

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

implementing effective good practice around children being heard isnt just about the research agenda though. Its also about sports delivery organisations promoting a general culture where children are aware of their right to be protected from harm, everyone is clear about how adults should behave towards children and children know that they will be heard if they speak out about poor practice or violence

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic]

But then there is an ethical problem to interview chidlren and bring their voices. I would not suggest that children;s voices should not be inlcuded, oppositely, they have to be heard, but the issues of how to interview them and so forth should be takne into consideration

[/quote]

Of course. Children's agency should be brought to the front. Qualitative child-friendly methodologies can help us I guess. If only political support (and funding) will be available!

[/quote]

agreed. there are ways of getting children's opinions that are ethical, though of course it requires careful consideration. i don't think the criterion needs to be restrictive by specifying the appropriate methodologies though - there are multiple good examples available of how it's been done in other contexts as well as in sport (see the CPSU's work) and organisations should be encouraged to work with researchers and other experts who have this knowledge.

Kari Fasting's picture

WE must not forget the adult athlete, i.e. those women past 18 years

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

implementing effective good practice around children being heard isnt just about the research agenda though. Its also about sports delivery organisations promoting a general culture where children are aware of their right to be protected from harm, everyone is clear about how adults should behave towards children and children know that they will be heard if they speak out about poor practice or violence

[/quote]

and about promoting a culture where children's views are incorporated into the policymaking/ agenda-setting process

Kari Fasting's picture

I would like to raise a question in relation to the creteria learning value/potential: the practice contains elements that have learning value, or can be of inspiration for others. Is an educational component included in here. I don't think it need to be. I believe (since so many in sport both ahtletes and coaches/ managers) don't know what GBV is it is important with an educational/awareness raising component

Pambos Demetriades's picture

[quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Weve found it very hard to support organisations to authentically measure the impact of GBV work. One of the things that is often absent is the view of the women themselves who are mean to be the beneficiaries of the work. We focua specifically on children in our work and that can add another level of complexity in finding out their views, whether GBV initiatives have had an actual impact on their experiences ect. Often organisations decide not to talk to children at all because thye dont know how to gather qualitative information from them effectively to their voices are lost. So one important measure is what impact are any interventions catually having on the qualitative experience children or women are haing of sport?

[/quote]

I agree with Sally - it's a real challenge to authentically measure the 'impact' of any GBV work. sound empirical magnitude studies have to be part of the starting point otherwise it's harder still to identify if/what has changed. but qualitative work is crucial as well as quantitative measurements, though organisations often don't understand it or prefer statistics because they're quicker to generate! 

[/quote]

Hi Mel and Sally, I agree with your thoughts which add to my comment below on the criteria that could be suggested for a practice to be good: " Since the current project pays particular attention to children in relation to GBV an additional criterion would be the inclusion of children in the preparation/participation/ implementation/ of the practice"?

[/quote]

I absolutely agree with Maria Papaefstathiou

. However we should also consider GbV in women over 18 yrs old.  

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

WE must not forget the adult athlete, i.e. those women past 18 years

[/quote]

Hi Kari :) adult-athletes should be given room to share their views

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

WE must not forget the adult athlete, i.e. those women past 18 years

[/quote]

yes. the age boundary is somewhat arbitrary, so of course the views of athletes should always be taken into account. there are athletes commissions in many countries that could (if they aren;t aready) take this on. it remains a truism thought that children's opinions are often left out. 

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

affectiveness comes from affect, how something affects something else... we need to explore then possibilities, but could be a way to change the quantitative parameters into something more qualitative something closer to people.

Ralitsa Golemanova's picture

Hello, everybody! This is Ralitsa - I was the national researcher for Bulgaria. Regretfully I could not identify any good practices for the country, so I cannot contribute to this first point of discussion. But will follow the next topics as well. 

Hope for a great discussion!

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Pambos Demetriades][quote=Maria Papaefstathiou][quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Weve found it very hard to support organisations to authentically measure the impact of GBV work. One of the things that is often absent is the view of the women themselves who are mean to be the beneficiaries of the work. We focua specifically on children in our work and that can add another level of complexity in finding out their views, whether GBV initiatives have had an actual impact on their experiences ect. Often organisations decide not to talk to children at all because thye dont know how to gather qualitative information from them effectively to their voices are lost. So one important measure is what impact are any interventions catually having on the qualitative experience children or women are haing of sport?

[/quote]

I agree with Sally - it's a real challenge to authentically measure the 'impact' of any GBV work. sound empirical magnitude studies have to be part of the starting point otherwise it's harder still to identify if/what has changed. but qualitative work is crucial as well as quantitative measurements, though organisations often don't understand it or prefer statistics because they're quicker to generate! 

[/quote]

Hi Mel and Sally, I agree with your thoughts which add to my comment below on the criteria that could be suggested for a practice to be good: " Since the current project pays particular attention to children in relation to GBV an additional criterion would be the inclusion of children in the preparation/participation/ implementation/ of the practice"?

[/quote]

I absolutely agree with Maria Papaefstathiou

. However we should also consider GbV in women over 18 yrs old.  

[/quote]

Geia sou Pambo :) Definitely. Adult-athletes' welfare and protection from GBV is also essential. Adults' life histories could offer many insights in order to understand GBV particularly in CY and ofcourse elsewhere. However, as it is mentioned by other colleagueas here, there are similar studies in place, undertaken in other contexts that could help us, in Cyprus, to see how to work towards bringing the voice of adult-athletes (and ofcourse children) forward. 

Lut Mergaert's picture

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

Irina Costache's picture

Just a quick comment on the childs participation point - I think it is crucial to include both promote practices that are age sensitive - meaning practices that address athletes across all ages. this is particularly important with athletes under 18 as unfortunatelly this is the age group that is most prone to be victimized - sexually, physically,verbally - since the vulnerabily  in between adults and children is high and due to other factors.

One other problem concerns professional sports - athelets in training - usually young people under 18 who sometimes suffer a lot of abuse in the course of training.

so yes age sensitive could be a criteria for selection of practices

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting]

I would like to raise a question in relation to the creteria learning value/potential: the practice contains elements that have learning value, or can be of inspiration for others. Is an educational component included in here. I don't think it need to be. I believe (since so many in sport both ahtletes and coaches/ managers) don't know what GBV is it is important with an educational/awareness raising component

[/quote]

I do agree; practices should have a learning value/potential, persons involved/addressed in this practice should learn different aspects through this practice; but it does not necessarily mean that each practice should have a formal educational part (e.g. training, educational material) ...; in my understanding the learning value/potential could be an effect by the practice itself, too

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Kari Fasting]

I would like to raise a question in relation to the creteria learning value/potential: the practice contains elements that have learning value, or can be of inspiration for others. Is an educational component included in here. I don't think it need to be. I believe (since so many in sport both ahtletes and coaches/ managers) don't know what GBV is it is important with an educational/awareness raising component

[/quote]

I do agree; practices should have a learning value/potential, persons involved/addressed in this practice should learn different aspects through this practice; but it does not necessarily mean that each practice should have a formal educational part (e.g. training, educational material) ...; in my understanding the learning value/potential could be an effect by the practice itself, too

[/quote]

e.g. criminal record check ... persons, who have to submit this certification, learn that gbv is a no-go, not wanted in that organisation ...

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for your valuable input in this regard. According to your more recent contributions, we believe that we are already discussing more refined, qualitative criteria that will help us selecting ‘good practices’ from among the promising practices that were identified. Which other, specific criteria would you suggest for a practice to be considered a ‘good practice’? 

[/quote]

Do not know how to name it, but engaging diverse partners, esp. public institutions, should be an important criterium. 

[/quote]

building up networks and collaborations  ...
as I ve realised in the work in Austria on this issue, this was a main key and resource, which at least made it possible to put (common) pressure on politics to start visibly working on this issue, which supported and empowered those people in the network staying working on this issue and being strong enough to deal with resistance

[/quote]

we agree. in our experince it is crucial create network and collaboration with other associations and Institutions as too as Univeristies and women organizations in order to develop crossing and integrated processes to face GBV in sport and society.

sperenyi@hotmail.com's picture

Hello, I am Szilvia Perenyi, one of the field researchers on the case of Hungary. it is nice to follow the discussion.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Kari Fasting]

WE must not forget the adult athlete, i.e. those women past 18 years

[/quote]

yes. the age boundary is somewhat arbitrary, so of course the views of athletes should always be taken into account. there are athletes commissions in many countries that could (if they aren;t aready) take this on. it remains a truism thought that children's opinions are often left out. 

[/quote]

I think it is important to bring discussions of inclusiveness forward without necessarily talking about GVB against women, children , men.. etc. Perhaps this language/ approach might create further stereotypes and new "vulnerabilities"?

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Kari Fasting]

I would like to raise a question in relation to the creteria learning value/potential: the practice contains elements that have learning value, or can be of inspiration for others. Is an educational component included in here. I don't think it need to be. I believe (since so many in sport both ahtletes and coaches/ managers) don't know what GBV is it is important with an educational/awareness raising component

[/quote]

I do agree; practices should have a learning value/potential, persons involved/addressed in this practice should learn different aspects through this practice; but it does not necessarily mean that each practice should have a formal educational part (e.g. training, educational material) ...; in my understanding the learning value/potential could be an effect by the practice itself, too

[/quote]

e.g. criminal record check ... persons, who have to submit this certification, learn that gbv is a no-go, not wanted in that organisation ...

[/quote]

sorry, I meant the obligatory presentation of a certificate of good conduct / or addit. codes of honors for coaches etc.

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

One of the key message we try to give sports is that some children and young poeple, including young women are additionally vulnerable to abuse/violence and therefore weneed to consider specifcally how to reduce these additional vulnerabilities. These groups would include disabled young poeple, LGBT young poeple, women and girls, elite and talented athletes, young people from minority ethnic communities and these groups need additional support in order to be protected from harm. Organisations need to understand what the additional vulnerabilities are and how to manage them.

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

We did not discuss the criterion: "resilience". I think it is important criteria. If the practice responds to resistence and encourages or develops a pltaform for discussing the porblem of GBV - then it will continue to survive at least on the discursive level. And this is an important aspect when the issue is ignored or resisted. But it might also "end" with some talks and no changes.

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert]

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

[/quote]

Yes, intersectionality or diversity or inclusion.. many names for similar things. I'm thinking about Ema Lomardo's (+ Alonso, Krizsan.. maybe..) article on critera for quality of  GBV policy and mine, Walby´s and Armstrong (2012). We recognise that it is almost impossible to measure quality in output, but being inclusive in the policy process should be regarded as a quality criteria. It is potentially particularly important in this context with the intersections gender, age and sexual orientation. I'll fins the references and send them to you, as Ema's article operationalise it.  

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

[/quote]

Yes, intersectionality or diversity or inclusion.. many names for similar things. I'm thinking about Ema Lomardo's (+ Alonso, Krizsan.. maybe..) article on critera for quality of  GBV policy and mine, Walby´s and Armstrong (2012). We recognise that it is almost impossible to measure quality in output, but being inclusive in the policy process should be regarded as a quality criteria. It is potentially particularly important in this context with the intersections gender, age and sexual orientation. I'll fins the references and send them to you, as Ema's article operationalise it.  

[/quote]

I mean, I'm aware of the difficulty in transfering critera from policy to good/best practice, but I'm trying to think about the processes and "formulation" as similar. A practice that neglects or makes invisible power dynamics other than gender is less likely to be succesful.

Content-wise, some of the sports people I spoke to ketp coming back to the importance of including the target groups in teh shaping/creating of good practice. One person said that teh reason teh practice works was that it was presented as "initiated from within", i.e. inclusive of the coaches it was aimed at in its very formulation.

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

One of the key message we try to give sports is that some children and young poeple, including young women are additionally vulnerable to abuse/violence and therefore weneed to consider specifcally how to reduce these additional vulnerabilities. These groups would include disabled young poeple, LGBT young poeple, women and girls, elite and talented athletes, young people from minority ethnic communities and these groups need additional support in order to be protected from harm. Organisations need to understand what the additional vulnerabilities are and how to manage them.

[/quote]

Agree!

sperenyi@hotmail.com's picture

I am not sure, you all may have raised the issue about how differently GBV is approached, discussed, evaluated in EU countries, in some it is still outside of open discussions in society; hidden in the secrets of sport communities. And it takes time and sensitive approach until sports organizations arrive from rejection of the existence of GBV to a rejection of GBV in sport by any actors. Some countries are taking the first steps now.

Daniel Rhind's picture

Hi All,

I completely agree regarding the need to involve key stakeholders at all stages of an intervention from development through to evaluation and not just at the delivery stage. This helps to promote a sense of ownership which in turn enhances the effectiveness of the intervention.

Daniel

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

[/quote]

Yes, intersectionality or diversity or inclusion.. many names for similar things. I'm thinking about Ema Lomardo's (+ Alonso, Krizsan.. maybe..) article on critera for quality of  GBV policy and mine, Walby´s and Armstrong (2012). We recognise that it is almost impossible to measure quality in output, but being inclusive in the policy process should be regarded as a quality criteria. It is potentially particularly important in this context with the intersections gender, age and sexual orientation. I'll fins the references and send them to you, as Ema's article operationalise it.  

[/quote]

Thank you Sofia. Yes, we would be very interested in reading this.

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Thank you for this lively discussion about criteria to assess good practices. To sum up, we understand that:

  • sub-qualitative-criteria need to considered, particularly when 'effectiveness' is being assessed.
  • impact and effectiveness are both relevant and neither can be dismissed.
  • context does matter and seems to be a transversal sub-criterion in several criteria (such as effectiveness and transferability).
  • 'involvement of beneficiaries' (either in the planning phase, implementation and/or evaluation) and ‘inclusiveness’ need to be added as criteria.
Catarina Arnaut's picture

Thank you for your contributions regarding criteria to assess good practices in the field of prevention of gender-based violence in sport. Now we would like to discuss success factors, as well as challenges that one may encounter when undertaking efforts against gender-based violence in sport.

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

[/quote]

Yes, intersectionality or diversity or inclusion.. many names for similar things. I'm thinking about Ema Lomardo's (+ Alonso, Krizsan.. maybe..) article on critera for quality of  GBV policy and mine, Walby´s and Armstrong (2012). We recognise that it is almost impossible to measure quality in output, but being inclusive in the policy process should be regarded as a quality criteria. It is potentially particularly important in this context with the intersections gender, age and sexual orientation. I'll fins the references and send them to you, as Ema's article operationalise it.  

[/quote]

I mean, I'm aware of the difficulty in transfering critera from policy to good/best practice, but I'm trying to think about the processes and "formulation" as similar. A practice that neglects or makes invisible power dynamics other than gender is less likely to be succesful.

Content-wise, some of the sports people I spoke to ketp coming back to the importance of including the target groups in teh shaping/creating of good practice. One person said that teh reason teh practice works was that it was presented as "initiated from within", i.e. inclusive of the coaches it was aimed at in its very formulation.

[/quote]

We think it is very important this discussion as we feel that it is crucial to link you competences in the analisis and evaluation with the concete practics realised by sport for all organisations as ours (UISP). We need each other. In our experience it is foundamental to work together. 

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

[/quote]

Yes, intersectionality or diversity or inclusion.. many names for similar things. I'm thinking about Ema Lomardo's (+ Alonso, Krizsan.. maybe..) article on critera for quality of  GBV policy and mine, Walby´s and Armstrong (2012). We recognise that it is almost impossible to measure quality in output, but being inclusive in the policy process should be regarded as a quality criteria. It is potentially particularly important in this context with the intersections gender, age and sexual orientation. I'll fins the references and send them to you, as Ema's article operationalise it.  

[/quote]

I mean, I'm aware of the difficulty in transfering critera from policy to good/best practice, but I'm trying to think about the processes and "formulation" as similar. A practice that neglects or makes invisible power dynamics other than gender is less likely to be succesful.

Content-wise, some of the sports people I spoke to ketp coming back to the importance of including the target groups in teh shaping/creating of good practice. One person said that teh reason teh practice works was that it was presented as "initiated from within", i.e. inclusive of the coaches it was aimed at in its very formulation.

[/quote]

I agree, Sofia. In my experience, 'ownership' of the sport organisations is key! Thanks for your contribution

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

Daniel Rhind's picture

In terms of criteria, it is also important to value qualitative and quantitative data. There appears to be a lack of empirical and systematic evaluations of interventions. However, there is anecdotal evidence of effectiveness. It is often the qualitative stories that are powerful in demonstrating impact. This can be used at this stage while we encourage the need for future interventions to collect more systematic data.

Daniel

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Daniel Rhind]

Hi All,

I completely agree regarding the need to involve key stakeholders at all stages of an intervention from development through to evaluation and not just at the delivery stage. This helps to promote a sense of ownership which in turn enhances the effectiveness of the intervention.

Daniel

[/quote]

I also agree that including key stakeholders in the process of developing, deciding measures & implementing (and therefore making them responsible for the results of the implementation  process, too) is in my opinion one of the success factors in implementing strategies and measures

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

People involved (all sport stakeholders) need to truly believe the importance and the need for it

Ralitsa Golemanova's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

I've mentioned this numerous time in my report, in the case of Bulgaria, to reach the stage of implementing prevention initiatives, there should be a public discussion about the problem and recognition by institutions that it does exist. without this public awareness, including within relevant government bodies and the sports organisations themselves, it is not possible to implement prevention initiatives 

Melanie Lang's picture

here's a few challenges to start us off

lack of money/investment

lack of ownership/institutional 'buy in' of the problem 

lack of belief about the magnitude of the problem

lack of understanding that prevention is part of the role of sport

tendancy to focus on the more 'serious' (often criminalised) forms of violence

difficulty developing culural change

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

People involved (all sport stakeholders) need to truly believe the importance and the need for it

[/quote]

So again, ownership is crucial.

How to create ownership?

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

There shoudl be both political will to address the problems of GBV in sport and firm commitmet to do something about this. My research shows that many leaders who have the voice and power will not do anything because the issue "is not important"

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

In terms of challenges I also think some contexts dont have a shared language and understanding of what GBV is. Behaviours can be rationalied as cultural or acceptable because of ingrained ideas about women. This can be ethnic culture, organisational culture or sports specific culture.

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

How... ? You also mean responsability? If this happen and I'm showing that this is happening, you're also responsible of this because you are doing nothing? Or this approach is more coercive than ownership?

sperenyi@hotmail.com's picture

GBV is approached, discussed, evaluated differently in EU countries, in some it is still outside of open discussions in society; hidden in the secrets of sport communities. And it takes time and sensitive approach until sports organizations arrive from rejection of the existence of GBV to a rejection of GBV in sport by any actors. These countries needs to take steps quicker, changes happend in tens of years in countries on more open stage today.

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Ralitsa Golemanova][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

I've mentioned this numerous time in my report, in the case of Bulgaria, to reach the stage of implementing prevention initiatives, there should be a public discussion about the problem and recognition by institutions that it does exist. without this public awareness, including within relevant government bodies and the sports organisations themselves, it is not possible to implement prevention initiatives 

[/quote]

what helped us in Austria to involve those relevant key stakeholders of sport into the process of developing this natl. strategy was: to follow the European policy as a basis and argument for action (EU proposal on strategies on Gender equality in sport 2014-2020);

having an official Europan policy behind, made it much easier for the (sport) politicans to work on it; 

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Sofia, in relation to your point about diversity/inclusiveness: do you mean that interventions should pay attention to intersectionality issues in GbV? Or could you a bit deeper into this point? How could this be operationalised in criteria for GP?

[/quote]

Yes, intersectionality or diversity or inclusion.. many names for similar things. I'm thinking about Ema Lomardo's (+ Alonso, Krizsan.. maybe..) article on critera for quality of  GBV policy and mine, Walby´s and Armstrong (2012). We recognise that it is almost impossible to measure quality in output, but being inclusive in the policy process should be regarded as a quality criteria. It is potentially particularly important in this context with the intersections gender, age and sexual orientation. I'll fins the references and send them to you, as Ema's article operationalise it.  

[/quote]

Walby, Armstrong & Strid (2012) on how the "best" gender equality architecture takes multiple inequalities into account: http://sp.oxfordjournals.org/content/19/4/446.abstract

Kriszan 6 Lombardo (2013) on intersectionality as a critera for good quality gender equality policy:
http://ejw.sagepub.com/content/20/1/77.abstract

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

People involved (all sport stakeholders) need to truly believe the importance and the need for it

[/quote]

So again, ownership is crucial.

How to create ownership?

[/quote]

good question Tine! i think part of the answer is involving actors (esp those required to implement) in developments, bottom up style rather than only top down to get them on board; this is a kind of carrot approach. sally's earlier point about linking achievement of criteria to funding is a more stick approach - but it worked in the UK in relation to getting sports organisations to accept their responsibilites for children's welfare.

Zuzana Ocenasova's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

In terms of challenges I also think some contexts dont have a shared language and understanding of what GBV is. Behaviours can be rationalied as cultural or acceptable because of ingrained ideas about women. This can be ethnic culture, organisational culture or sports specific culture.

[/quote]

I completely agree, particularly for sport culture. Then the question is how to define success - it should get closer to changing attitudes than changing practices. But then again there is a discussion how to meassure it....

Ralitsa Golemanova's picture

[quote=Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic]

There shoudl be both political will to address the problems of GBV in sport and firm commitmet to do something about this. My research shows that many leaders who have the voice and power will not do anything because the issue "is not important"

[/quote]

Same observations in my case.

Sofia Strid's picture

Additinal key success factor:

Prevention needs to be included/mainstremed into the core activities of the sports organisation, rather than as temporary additional projects. It requires that funders (private or state) put demands on sports organisations in order for them to recive funding. 

General Sports Federation Austria's picture

And  now we have an proposition paper from all sport politcians which helps us to set the implementation because it is the official proposal of Austrian sports from the ministery to each sport federation. This was one of the arguments that the national working group can continue and gets financial support.

[/quote]

what helped us in Austria to involve those relevant key stakeholders of sport into the process of developing this natl. strategy was: to follow the European policy as a basis and argument for action (EU proposal on strategies on Gender equality in sport 2014-2020);

having an official Europan policy behind, made it much easier for the (sport) politicans to work on it; 

[/quote]

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid]

Additinal key success factor:

Prevention needs to be included/mainstremed into the core activities of the sports organisation, rather than as temporary additional projects. It requires that funders (private or state) put demands on sports organisations in order for them to recive funding. 

[/quote]

totally agree

projects are necessary for first phase of sensibilisation, making the problem visible,

long-term measures have to be implemented into the structures and daily routines (and combine if with money/funding ...)

Daniel Rhind's picture

I think that peer sharing and learning can be very successful. There appears to be less resistance when a new strategy is coming from a peer as opposed to being top-down. Creating forums through which people can share experiences and ideas across Europe can facilitate success.

Daniel

Kari Fasting's picture

Another challenge is that the athletes don't report, don't come forward, for many different reasons, one is of course that the sport don't have a reporting system. But this is related to the former discussion about visibility and focus on the theme. In some countries actions seem to be taken either when there are empirical data, or when an famous elite level athlete reports GBV which is picked up by the media.

Daniel Rhind's picture

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

Kari Fasting's picture

Hi Daniel

That sounds like a great idea

Kari Fasting's picture

Hi Daniel

That sounds like a great idea

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

[quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

absoloutely. a key message for organisations is taht protecting young people from any violence benefits everyong in the organisation

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Sofia Strid]

Additinal key success factor:

Prevention needs to be included/mainstremed into the core activities of the sports organisation, rather than as temporary additional projects. It requires that funders (private or state) put demands on sports organisations in order for them to recive funding. 

[/quote]

totally agree

projects are necessary for first phase of sensibilisation, making the problem visible,

long-term measures have to be implemented into the structures and daily routines (and combine if with money/funding ...)

[/quote]

absolutely! for any prevention strategy to be successful it must be recognised that prevention is a central responsibility of the role of sport/ sport actors - a core rather than a peripheral responsibility.

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

absoloutely. a key message for organisations is taht protecting young people from any violence benefits everyong in the organisation

[/quote]

I agree, too

showing the added value supports a lot

quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Lut Mergaert's picture

We can consider 'key success factors' as things that we can influence/control in the design and implementation of initiatives, whereas 'basic requirements' would be elements that ideally are present prior to launching an initiative for it to succeed. We already have identified in our discussion a number of elements as 'key success factors', but I believe some can be regarded as 'basic requirements' (e.g. political will, or recognition of the existence of the problem). Can we try to further identify elements, making this distinction?

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert]

We can consider 'key success factors' as things that we can influence/control in the design and implementation of initiatives, whereas 'basic requirements' would be elements that ideally are present prior to launching an initiative for it to succeed. We already have identified in our discussion a number of elements as 'key success factors', but I believe some can be regarded as 'basic requirements' (e.g. political will, or recognition of the existence of the problem). Can we try to further identify elements, making this distinction?

[/quote]

Can it be a basic requirement that the country has a gender equality plan?

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert]

We can consider 'key success factors' as things that we can influence/control in the design and implementation of initiatives, whereas 'basic requirements' would be elements that ideally are present prior to launching an initiative for it to succeed. We already have identified in our discussion a number of elements as 'key success factors', but I believe some can be regarded as 'basic requirements' (e.g. political will, or recognition of the existence of the problem). Can we try to further identify elements, making this distinction?

[/quote]

Can it be a basic requirement that the country has a gender equality plan?

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

Hi Daniel, great to have you joining in!

I agree with you. Once they see what they can win, they will get motivated more.

Do we have evidence that preventing GBV has a positive impact on performance? At least we should be able to substantiate that GBV costs them lots of money! ;)

Zuzana Ocenasova's picture

I am afraid I have to leave the discussion now. Thanks for inspiring and challenging thoughts and looking forward to read the transkript.

Catarina Arnaut

Thank you for joining the discussion, Zuzana! A report will be published in two weeks. Talk to you soon!

Lut Mergaert's picture

Would you agree that a shared understanding of the notion of  what is 'gender-based violence' is a basic requirement? And how can such shared understanding be promoted? It's not 'just' about violence against women, and neither is it 'just' about sexual violence...

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

Hi Daniel, great to have you joining in!

I agree with you. Once they see what they can win, they will get motivated more.

Do we have evidence that preventing GBV has a positive impact on performance? At least we should be able to substantiate that GBV costs them lots of money! ;)

[/quote]

I don't think we have evidence, and it is surprising that some of these athletes that have come forward many years after they ended their career manage to perform quite well when they were abused.. On the other hand we don't know how they would have performed if they hadn't been abused. Many report that this has taken a lot of enegy so one really should think that it would impact on the performance.

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Lut Mergaert]

We can consider 'key success factors' as things that we can influence/control in the design and implementation of initiatives, whereas 'basic requirements' would be elements that ideally are present prior to launching an initiative for it to succeed. We already have identified in our discussion a number of elements as 'key success factors', but I believe some can be regarded as 'basic requirements' (e.g. political will, or recognition of the existence of the problem). Can we try to further identify elements, making this distinction?

[/quote]

Can it be a basic requirement that the country has a gender equality plan?

[/quote]

I would  agree, a gender equality plan / or natl plan in the area could be a basic requirement

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Lut Mergaert]

We can consider 'key success factors' as things that we can influence/control in the design and implementation of initiatives, whereas 'basic requirements' would be elements that ideally are present prior to launching an initiative for it to succeed. We already have identified in our discussion a number of elements as 'key success factors', but I believe some can be regarded as 'basic requirements' (e.g. political will, or recognition of the existence of the problem). Can we try to further identify elements, making this distinction?

[/quote]

Can it be a basic requirement that the country has a gender equality plan?

[/quote]

I would  agree, a gender equality plan / or natl plan in the area could be a basic requirement

[/quote]

And a plan on GBV.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

People involved (all sport stakeholders) need to truly believe the importance and the need for it

[/quote]

So again, ownership is crucial.

How to create ownership?

[/quote]

good question Tine! i think part of the answer is involving actors (esp those required to implement) in developments, bottom up style rather than only top down to get them on board; this is a kind of carrot approach. sally's earlier point about linking achievement of criteria to funding is a more stick approach - but it worked in the UK in relation to getting sports organisations to accept their responsibilites for children's welfare.

[/quote]

Could there be another approach, to adopt, so that individuals will respond because of ethical duty? Not just because they will receive funding or will be legally obliged?

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Some of these success factors and challenges have already been addressed in our discussion today.

Which are in your opinion ‘key success factors’ for implementing prevention initiatives in the field of gender-based violence in sport?

[/quote]

People involved (all sport stakeholders) need to truly believe the importance and the need for it

[/quote]

So again, ownership is crucial.

How to create ownership?

[/quote]

good question Tine! i think part of the answer is involving actors (esp those required to implement) in developments, bottom up style rather than only top down to get them on board; this is a kind of carrot approach. sally's earlier point about linking achievement of criteria to funding is a more stick approach - but it worked in the UK in relation to getting sports organisations to accept their responsibilites for children's welfare.

[/quote]

Could there be another approach, to adopt, so that individuals will respond because of ethical duty? Not just because they will receive funding or will be legally obliged?

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert]

Would you agree that a shared understanding of the notion of  what is 'gender-based violence' is a basic requirement? And how can such shared understanding be promoted? It's not 'just' about violence against women, and neither is it 'just' about sexual violence...

[/quote]

I completely agreed. Good point. And I'd add don't expect this shared understanding to be easy to reach or forever.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

Hi Daniel, great to have you joining in!

I agree with you. Once they see what they can win, they will get motivated more.

Do we have evidence that preventing GBV has a positive impact on performance? At least we should be able to substantiate that GBV costs them lots of money! ;)

[/quote]

agree with these thoughts. This approach might help sport areas to open up and discuss GBV more openly. 

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Lut Mergaert]

Would you agree that a shared understanding of the notion of  what is 'gender-based violence' is a basic requirement? And how can such shared understanding be promoted? It's not 'just' about violence against women, and neither is it 'just' about sexual violence...

[/quote]

yes, it could be. It is in line with what I was thinking when I mentioned a gender-equality plan, one need to know what gender is etc. I wonder if the shared understanding can be promoted in EU through some rules/regulations. I am thinking of that in the Norwegian Equality Actk, Gender and sexual harassment is defined and exemplified??

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Two basic requirements have been put forward:

  • having a gender equality and/or gender-based violence national plan
  • having a common understanding of 'gender-based violence'

Can we think of more basic requirements?

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Would you agree that a shared understanding of the notion of  what is 'gender-based violence' is a basic requirement? And how can such shared understanding be promoted? It's not 'just' about violence against women, and neither is it 'just' about sexual violence...

[/quote]

And on top this shared understanding will be made of fragments and discontinuities and sigularities according to each country's policies and Laws

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)][quote=Lut Mergaert]

Would you agree that a shared understanding of the notion of  what is 'gender-based violence' is a basic requirement? And how can such shared understanding be promoted? It's not 'just' about violence against women, and neither is it 'just' about sexual violence...

[/quote]

I completely agreed. Good point. And I'd add don't expect this shared understanding to be easy to reach or forever.

[/quote]

I think this relates to the previous issue of strategic framing and national specific tweaking of good practice. GBV can be understood as a problem of gender+ equality, health, economics, crime, well-being etc. 

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Two basic requirements have been put forward:

  • having a gender equality and/or gender-based violence national plan
  • having a common understanding of 'gender-based violence'

Can we think of more basic requirements?

[/quote]

- An organised sports sector which is not totally independent of the state

- A civil/criminal justice system that can intervene in cases of gbv in sports

Do you mean common understanding across the whole of the EU as a basic requirement, or do you mean a shared understanding among national actors? The former is of course part of a massive debate on EU legal competence.

Daniel Rhind's picture

[quote=Tine Vertommen][quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

Hi Daniel, great to have you joining in!

I agree with you. Once they see what they can win, they will get motivated more.

Do we have evidence that preventing GBV has a positive impact on performance? At least we should be able to substantiate that GBV costs them lots of money! ;)

[/quote]

I think that there is a lack of empirical evidence in general to link safeguarding with participation and performance, although there is lots of anecdotal evidence. I think that there is a strong argument for a key recommendation of this project being the need for research into the benefits of preventing GBV (and safeguarding more generally) and the costs of not doing it.

Daniel

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Two basic requirements have been put forward:

  • having a gender equality and/or gender-based violence national plan
  • having a common understanding of 'gender-based violence'

Can we think of more basic requirements?

[/quote]

We have to have some kind of basic requirements from the sport organizations I think. They are guite independent NGO's in many countries, so it would be difficult if we don't have them on board in one way or another. Repeat the old stuff about the necessity that sport organization must have a policy and an action plan??

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Which warning or tips can we put together for stakeholders who wish to take up prevention initiatives to promote positive changes in the attitudes and behaviour of athletes, coaches, and other relevant stakeholders in sport?

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Two basic requirements have been put forward:

  • having a gender equality and/or gender-based violence national plan
  • having a common understanding of 'gender-based violence'

Can we think of more basic requirements?

[/quote]

We have to have some kind of basic requirements from the sport organizations I think. They are guite independent NGO's in many countries, so it would be difficult if we don't have them on board in one way or another. Repeat the old stuff about the necessity that sport organization must have a policy and an action plan??

[/quote]

I do agree;

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Two basic requirements have been put forward:

  • having a gender equality and/or gender-based violence national plan
  • having a common understanding of 'gender-based violence'

Can we think of more basic requirements?

[/quote]

We have to have some kind of basic requirements from the sport organizations I think. They are guite independent NGO's in many countries, so it would be difficult if we don't have them on board in one way or another. Repeat the old stuff about the necessity that sport organization must have a policy and an action plan??

[/quote]

i know those things have been said many times before, but i think they're still important; sport orgs should certainlyhave them, along with key statements that GBV has no place in sport and that the orgs support this view. 

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which warning or tips can we put together for stakeholders who wish to take up prevention initiatives to promote positive changes in the attitudes and behaviour of athletes, coaches, and other relevant stakeholders in sport?

[/quote]

Build alliances between target groups and stakeholders; formulate prevention interventions from within; take culture specific elemsnt into account; inclöude the people you target in teh shaoing of the prevention; start as project, but make sure long term funding/committment is in place; mainstream prevention into the daily activbity of the organisations; have leaders/champions onboard....

University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia  (Montse Martin)'s picture

Dear all,

Unfortunately, I have to leave. We are having a workshop in Barcelona on women's less and less enrolment numbers in Sport sciences degrees at Universities.

Thank you very much for this discussion. I will try to log on later before 23.59. Looking forward to receive the transcripts in near future.

Keep in touch

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=University of Vic - University of Central Catalonia (Montse Martin)]

Dear all,

Unfortunately, I have to leave. We are having a workshop in Barcelona on women's less and less enrolment numbers in Sport sciences degrees at Universities.

Thank you very much for this discussion. I will try to log on later before 23.59. Looking forward to receive the transcripts in near future.

Keep in touch

[/quote]

Ok, Montse! Good luck, and thanks for joining. See you!

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

I think its a balance between the legislative arguments i.e. you have a duty of care to people in your organisation, you open yourself up to litigation if you fail in that duty of care, there are severe reputational risks in publically failing in your duty of care etc, the moral arguments - this is the right thing to do, and the participation argument as Daniel referred to - if people feel safe in your organisation thye will want to remain in it and it will be a success.

Sofia Strid's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

In the Swedish context, all employers' with more than 10 employees have to have a GE plan, which must include GBV. Not breaking this law is obvioulsy a compelling argument. 

I thikn that there is little obvious/blatant resistance to preventing GBV in sports - no organisation woudl say that they do not want to prevent it. The problem is, based on the Swedish case, that the organisations are unaware of the problem, they are generally resistant to change, are nabsed on old traditional male norms etc etc. 

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

In the Swedish context, all employers' with more than 10 employees have to have a GE plan, which must include GBV. Not breaking this law is obvioulsy a compelling argument. 

I thikn that there is little obvious/blatant resistance to preventing GBV in sports - no organisation woudl say that they do not want to prevent it. The problem is, based on the Swedish case, that the organisations are unaware of the problem, they are generally resistant to change, are nabsed on old traditional male norms etc etc. 

[/quote]

the other very powerful tool is ambassdors from the sport itself. If high profile people from within the organisation are vocal about the problems and the solutions this has a huge impact

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

firstly stakeholders must accept there's a problem. prevalence stats (which don't exist in many places) might help convince them. then they must accept that the problem is a) theirs, and so they have a responsibility to stop it, and b) that they can do something about it. reiterating the point that sports performance and welfare are not mutually exclusive is a start, and showing that others have been successful could also help.  

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

In the Swedish context, all employers' with more than 10 employees have to have a GE plan, which must include GBV. Not breaking this law is obvioulsy a compelling argument. 

I thikn that there is little obvious/blatant resistance to preventing GBV in sports - no organisation woudl say that they do not want to prevent it. The problem is, based on the Swedish case, that the organisations are unaware of the problem, they are generally resistant to change, are nabsed on old traditional male norms etc etc. 

[/quote]

definitely. and linking to funding again. in the UK when sports organsiations were asked to implement child welfare strategies, almost none did. when they were told tey HAD to in order to receive government funding, all did! 

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove][quote=Sofia Strid][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

In the Swedish context, all employers' with more than 10 employees have to have a GE plan, which must include GBV. Not breaking this law is obvioulsy a compelling argument. 

I thikn that there is little obvious/blatant resistance to preventing GBV in sports - no organisation woudl say that they do not want to prevent it. The problem is, based on the Swedish case, that the organisations are unaware of the problem, they are generally resistant to change, are nabsed on old traditional male norms etc etc. 

[/quote]

the other very powerful tool is ambassdors from the sport itself. If high profile people from within the organisation are vocal about the problems and the solutions this has a huge impact

[/quote]

good point sally. can help raise profile and acceptance of the issue.

Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Two basic requirements have been put forward:

  • having a gender equality and/or gender-based violence national plan
  • having a common understanding of 'gender-based violence'

Can we think of more basic requirements?

[/quote]

We have to have some kind of basic requirements from the sport organizations I think. They are guite independent NGO's in many countries, so it would be difficult if we don't have them on board in one way or another. Repeat the old stuff about the necessity that sport organization must have a policy and an action plan??

[/quote]

i know those things have been said many times before, but i think they're still important; sport orgs should certainlyhave them, along with key statements that GBV has no place in sport and that the orgs support this view. 

[/quote]

Hello,

In Germany we have good experiences with common declarations with our member organizations/sport federations.

E.g.: So called Munich Declaration: An agreement of the DOSB and its member organisations on prevention of sexualized violence in sport. Within the agreement our federations have to support qualification concerning GBV, have to implement “code of conduct”, have to name persons, who are responsible only for GBV...

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

regarding convincing arguments- there should be understanding that inclusive culture of a sport club/federation etc is a successufl factor for the highest achievements and this should be in the "statutes"/regulations of the club 

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Thank you for all your input so far. We would like to move on and discuss policy recommendations in the area of gender-based violence in sport (some have been mentioned already). We understand ‘policies’ as guiding actions that aim at achieving certain outcomes. Policies are issued by governance bodies at EU, national and sport organisation level.

What kind of policy actions would help combatting gender-based violence in sport at the EU, national and sport organisation level?

Sofia Strid's picture

I have to leave an hour early - sorry about this!

Looking forward to reading the transcript. Good work, everyone!

Lut Mergaert's picture

Many thanks, Sofia! It was good to have you here!

[quote=Sofia Strid]

Renata Włoch's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for all your input so far. We would like to move on and discuss policy recommendations in the area of gender-based violence in sport (some have been mentioned already). We understand ‘policies’ as guiding actions that aim at achieving certain outcomes. Policies are issued by governance bodies at EU, national and sport organisation level.

What kind of policy actions would help combatting gender-based violence in sport at the EU, national and sport organisation level?

[/quote]

I will again emphasise my conviction that the most important thing is to convince the public institutions as to the need of investing in reliable diagnosis of the problem by way of social research. 

Without data/scientific proofs the sport organizations will not be willing to introduce any kind of policy recommendations because they will always deny the sheer existence of the problem. 

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for all your input so far. We would like to move on and discuss policy recommendations in the area of gender-based violence in sport (some have been mentioned already). We understand ‘policies’ as guiding actions that aim at achieving certain outcomes. Policies are issued by governance bodies at EU, national and sport organisation level.

What kind of policy actions would help combatting gender-based violence in sport at the EU, national and sport organisation level?

[/quote]

In Austria we recently developed a GBV Action Plan within the Natl. Action Plan on Gender Equality in Sport based on the the EU proposal 2014-2020. In my view embedding the issue of GBV into a broader approach is helpful.

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Two policy recommendations have already been suggested by Daniel:

  • Creating fora through which people can share experiences and ideas across Europe can facilitate success.
  • Promote research about the benefits of preventing GBV (and safeguarding more generally) and the costs of not doing it.
Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for all your input so far. We would like to move on and discuss policy recommendations in the area of gender-based violence in sport (some have been mentioned already). We understand ‘policies’ as guiding actions that aim at achieving certain outcomes. Policies are issued by governance bodies at EU, national and sport organisation level.

What kind of policy actions would help combatting gender-based violence in sport at the EU, national and sport organisation level?

[/quote]

In Austria we recently developed a GBV Action Plan within the Natl. Action Plan on Gender Equality in Sport based on the the EU proposal 2014-2020. In my view embedding the issue of GBV into a broader approach is helpful.

[/quote]

and having data/scientific proofs could help, too

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

It is the extremely negative impact of GBV on girls and women's health/life.

Rosa Diketmueller's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

It is the extremely negative impact of GBV on girls and women's health/life.

[/quote]

and in my opinion, its impact on the drop out-rate of girls ( and boys)

Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic's picture

Thank you for your contribution and interesting thoughts. Vilana

Lut Mergaert's picture

[quote=Dr. Vilana Pilinkaite-Sotirovic]

Thank you for your contribution and interesting thoughts. Vilana

[/quote]

Many thanks for your input, Vilana.

Catarina Arnaut's picture

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for all your input so far. We would like to move on and discuss policy recommendations in the area of gender-based violence in sport (some have been mentioned already). We understand ‘policies’ as guiding actions that aim at achieving certain outcomes. Policies are issued by governance bodies at EU, national and sport organisation level.

What kind of policy actions would help combatting gender-based violence in sport at the EU, national and sport organisation level?

[/quote]

Within our German campaign “Strong Networks against Violence – No  Violence against Women and Girls!” the DOSB has created a format that uses sport to instruct girls and women on vital issues such as how to assert themselves and to learn how to defend themselves and to gain self-reliance.  Within that context we cooperate and collaborate very fruitful with different political institutions, eg. Since last year our requests got a great and helpful support by the campaign of the German Federal Office for Family, Senior, Women’s and Youth Affairs call “Hilfetelefon”, http://www.hilfetelefon.de/en/about-us.html

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

It is the extremely negative impact of GBV on girls and women's health/life.

[/quote]

and in my opinion, its impact on the drop out-rate of girls ( and boys)

[/quote]

Rosa

I agree, but we don't have so valid data on this. I found in one of on of my study that more athletes had left sport because of an harassing coach, but they didn't leave sport, they just changed to another sport. We definitely need more studies here

Kari

Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB's picture

[quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Rosa Diketmueller][quote=Kari Fasting][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

It is the extremely negative impact of GBV on girls and women's health/life.

[/quote]

and in my opinion, its impact on the drop out-rate of girls ( and boys)

[/quote]

Rosa

I agree, but we don't have so valid data on this. I found in one of on of my study that more athletes had left sport because of an harassing coach, but they didn't leave sport, they just changed to another sport. We definitely need more studies here

Kari

[/quote]

I agree.

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

[quote=Daniel Rhind]

I also think that emphasising that preventing GBV in sport will actually help organisations achieve their other goals rather than being an additional goal in itself. Preventing GBV should help to promote increased participation and performance (which are often the key drivers for decision makers in sport).

Daniel

[/quote]

This point is very interesting but we have to consider that the sporting system is veryn articolated and divers in the EU context as too as in at national level of the context. Sorry but as we are a sport for all organization we feel it very deeply. 

General Sports Federation Austria's picture

Thank you for the interesting discussion, I've  learned a lot.

I have to leave but looking forward to the transcript.

Greetings

Barbara

Catarina Arnaut

Thank you for participating, Barbara! A report will be made available in two weeks. Best wishes from our team.

Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

Level of sports organizations: Sport cannot and should not do everything on its own, however, it can team up with strong and experienced partners, eg.  

Association of Women’s Counselling and Emergency Help Centres, Association of Women's Shelters, Association of municipal equal opportunities commissioners and gender equality departments, organizations that provides services to victims of crime, association for people with mental handicap

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Renata Włoch][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Thank you for all your input so far. We would like to move on and discuss policy recommendations in the area of gender-based violence in sport (some have been mentioned already). We understand ‘policies’ as guiding actions that aim at achieving certain outcomes. Policies are issued by governance bodies at EU, national and sport organisation level.

What kind of policy actions would help combatting gender-based violence in sport at the EU, national and sport organisation level?

[/quote]

I will again emphasise my conviction that the most important thing is to convince the public institutions as to the need of investing in reliable diagnosis of the problem by way of social research. 

Without data/scientific proofs the sport organizations will not be willing to introduce any kind of policy recommendations because they will always deny the sheer existence of the problem. 

[/quote]

i agree robust data are vital (thoguh we don't really have this in the UK yet and still most sports orgs have bought into child welfare measures, so there's also more to cultural change than this). Perhaps requirements for this could be included in policy recommendations, along with recommendations that the data be collated (across EU??? - certainly nationally) and used along with other data to inform future policy actions/prevention strategies. i think recognition that robust and ongoing evaluation of strategies is essential too in the policy recommendations if prevention strategies are to be meaningful and 'effective'.   

Melanie Lang's picture

[quote=Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

Level of sports organizations: Sport cannot and should not do everything on its own, however, it can team up with strong and experienced partners, eg.  

Association of Women’s Counselling and Emergency Help Centres, Association of Women's Shelters, Association of municipal equal opportunities commissioners and gender equality departments, organizations that provides services to victims of crime, association for people with mental handicap

[/quote]

Good point Kirsten - collaboration beyond the sports sector is useful. what about a sport orgs level recommendations relating to having designated people responsible for promoting prevention, managing complaints etc.? could help with credibility and raising the profile of the issue

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Which are, in your opinion, convincing arguments that can be put forward for engaging different stakeholders in prevention work?

[/quote]

That stakeholders may have legal obligations. For instance, in cyprus, according to the law, adults engaged with children have mandate duty to denounce abuse. So adults need to be educated and trained to recognise signs of abuse and be informed on the handling procedures. There is a penal conviction if abuse is not being denounced.

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Melanie Lang][quote=Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

Level of sports organizations: Sport cannot and should not do everything on its own, however, it can team up with strong and experienced partners, eg.  

Association of Women’s Counselling and Emergency Help Centres, Association of Women's Shelters, Association of municipal equal opportunities commissioners and gender equality departments, organizations that provides services to victims of crime, association for people with mental handicap

[/quote]

Good point Kirsten - collaboration beyond the sports sector is useful. what about a sport orgs level recommendations relating to having designated people responsible for promoting prevention, managing complaints etc.? could help with credibility and raising the profile of the issue

[/quote]

I agree in that, and some countries have it, some call it a welfare officer. Minimum requirement should be that an umbrella sport org has this in place. there are so many sports org that are relatively small so I think that would be difficult in practice, but if they have one central person to relate to could be good

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

Level of sports organizations: Sport cannot and should not do everything on its own, however, it can team up with strong and experienced partners, eg.  

Association of Women’s Counselling and Emergency Help Centres, Association of Women's Shelters, Association of municipal equal opportunities commissioners and gender equality departments, organizations that provides services to victims of crime, association for people with mental handicap

[/quote]

I agree with Kirsten here

Catarina Arnaut's picture

Following Kirsten's contribution, which actors (can) play a key role in providing support in the implementation of prevention policies at EU, national and sport organisations level?

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

[quote=Kirsten Witte-Abe, DOSB][quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

Level of sports organizations: Sport cannot and should not do everything on its own, however, it can team up with strong and experienced partners, eg.  

Association of Women’s Counselling and Emergency Help Centres, Association of Women's Shelters, Association of municipal equal opportunities commissioners and gender equality departments, organizations that provides services to victims of crime, association for people with mental handicap

[/quote]

We agree. This is the point we feel decisive: "sport cannot and shoul not do everything ion its own..." . Infact we think the collaboration between different subjects like Sport organizations or Women association or Centres for support to women victim of violence/institutions should work together integrating the different competencies.

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

At Eu level - commitment across all EU governments that any organisation delivering activities for children/young people should have policies, procedures and personnel in place to deal with violence both proactively and reactively; governments should adopt this committment and mandate that these things should be put into practice in any organisation that is publically funded or recognised; national organisation level -  should adopt comprehensive policies and procedures for addressing all forms of violence and this shoudl form of general strategic and operational plans.

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

To be more precise: if, as output of our project, policy recommendations are formulated for the EU level, for the national level and for sports associations: which recommendations should be put forward for each level respectively? And should there be recommendations addressed also at other levels?

[/quote]

At Eu level - commitment across all EU governments that any organisation delivering activities for children/young people should have policies, procedures and personnel in place to deal with violence both proactively and reactively; governments should adopt this committment and mandate that these things should be put into practice in any organisation that is publically funded or recognised; national organisation level -  should adopt comprehensive policies and procedures for addressing all forms of violence and this shoudl form of general strategic and operational plans.

Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove's picture

Thank you for including me in this discussion. I will need to leave the discussion now but I hope you continue to share great ideas.

Sally

Tine Vertommen's picture

[quote=Child Protection in Sport Unit - Sally Proudlove]

Thank you for including me in this discussion. I will need to leave the discussion now but I hope you continue to share great ideas.

Sally

[/quote]

Bye Sally! Thank you so much for joining today. Best wishes!

Catarina Arnaut's picture

According to what we learnt during our fieldwork, the way EU Member States are addressing gender-based violence in sport differs to a great extent. Would it make sense to define different requirements for EU Member States to address gender-based violence according to its respective level of advancement? If we consider three levels of advancement, which requirements would you suggest for a basic, intermediate and advanced level respectively?

Raffaella chiodo 's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

Following Kirsten's contribution, which actors (can) play a key role in providing support in the implementation of prevention policies at EU, national and sport organisations level?

[/quote]

We think that trasversal and integrated networking actions and startegies (NGos and institution)  are needed otherwis we continue to procede in parallel worlds without reaching the point. We as sport organisation need to share with local national and international institutions our experience in order to make them more effective. Working for example in a strategy against GBV in sport through the school system is needed as a fruit of a common evaluation and definition of policies.

Maria Papaefstathiou's picture

Thank you for this discussion. I will have to leave now, but will try to be back later in the day. Thanks again! 

Catarina Arnaut

Thank you, Maria! It was great to have you in this interesting discussion. We'll be in touch soon.

Kari Fasting's picture

[quote=Catarina Arnaut]

According to what we learnt during our fieldwork, the way EU Member States are addressing gender-based violence in sport differs to a great extent. Would it make sense to define different requirements for EU Member States to address gender-based violence according to its respective level of advancement? If we consider three levels of advancement, which requirements would you suggest for a basic, intermediate and advanced level respectively?

[/quote]

Maybe this is a good idea, but the basic requirements that we discussed earlier must be in place for everyone. I also wonder if it would be possible instead of having levels present a continium, that the member states could work according to.