Gender Equality and You

11 Oct '18 Thu 15:3010/12/2018 6:30pm Austria Center Vienna (Bruno-Kreisky-Platz 1), Vienna, Austria public Gender Equality and You Europe/Vienna 10/11/2018 3:30pm
12 Oct '18 Fri 18:30
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Organised under the Austrian Presidency of the Council of the European Union, the European conference Gender Equality & YOU will be dedicated to the future priorities on gender equality in the EU. It will be a space where people of diverse generations, backgrounds and organisations meet and discuss at eye level: young people and youth representatives, Ministers for Gender Equality, political representatives from EU organisations as well as experts from NGOs and public institutions.

During the conference, EIGE will be launching the report 'Gender equality and youth: opportunities and risks of digitalisation' (forthcoming). The report was prepared at the request of the Austrian Presidency. It explores how digital technologies can be used to promote gender equality and what are the gender-related risks of digitalisation for young women and men.

This report is part of EIGE’s work to monitor EU progress towards gender equality in the context of the objectives of the Beijing Platform for Action (BPfA). The findings are enriched with the voices and opinions of youth from across the EU, providing valuable insights on the topic at hand.

To support discussions during the conference, EIGE prepared a series of six infographics (available under RESOURCES tab), featuring facts & findings from the report. Below you can find the infographics featuring the data sources.

Follow #GenderEqualityandYou on Facebook and Twitter for more news and updates.

 

Footnotes:  

1. Eurostat, (2018). Gender pay gap statistics. Available here 

2. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, Main reasons for part-time employment of young people by sex and age [yth_empl_070], Main reason for part-time employment – distribution by sex and age [lfsa_epgar].

3. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, Inactive population not seeking employment by sex, age and main reason [Ifsa_egar].

4. EIGE, (2018). Study and work in the EU: set apart by gender. EU-LFS, calculations based on 2013-2014 microdata (no data for MT).

5. EIGE, (2015). Gender gap in pensions in the EU: Research note to the Latvian Presidency. Available online here.

6. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat EU-SILC survey at-risk-of-poverty rate by poverty threshold, age and sex [ilc_li02].

 

Footnotes

1. EIGE’s calculation, Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study (HBSC), 2013/2014 Survey. Data is for the EU-27 (data for Cyprus and Northern Ireland not available). HBSC report available here 

2. EIGE’s calculation, Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study (HBSC), 2013/2014 Survey. Data is for the EU-27 (data for Cyprus, Northern Ireland and Wallonia not available). HBSC report available here 

3. Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) LGBT survey, 2012, Available at here 

4. The acronym “LGBTQI+” is used here to be more inclusive of communities and to recognise continuously evolving terminology. The acronym “LGBT” is used in the previous statistics, in line with the Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) survey to which it refers.

5. Madigan, S., Ly, A., Rash, C. L., Van Ouytsel, J., & Temple, J. R., (2018). Prevalence of multiple forms of sexting behavior among youth: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA paediatrics, 172(4), 327-335.

6. EIGE, 2018. Gender, youth and digitalisation: opportunities and risks.

 

Footnotes:

1. EIGE’s calculation, Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), (2012). Violence against women: an EU-wide survey.

2. EIGE’s calculation, Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study (HBSC), 2013/2014 Survey. Data is for the EU-27 (data for Cyprus and Northern Ireland not available). 15 –year olds were asked whether they had experienced anyone sending mean instant messages, wall-postings, emails and text messages. HBSC report available here 

3. EIGE’s calculation, Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study (HBSC), 2013/2014 Survey. Data for the EU-27 (data for Cyprus and Northern Ireland not available). 15 year-olds were asked whether they had experienced anyone posting unflattering or inappropriate pictures online without permission. HBSC report available  here 

4. Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), (2012). Violence against women: an EU-wide survey: Main results, pp. 87. Available here

Footnotes:

1. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, Tertiary educational attainment by sex, age group 30-34, [t2020_41].

2. European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE) (2017c), Review of the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States. Available here 

3. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, Graduates by education level, programme orientation, sex and field of education [educ_uoe_grad02].

4. Eurostat, Early leavers from education and training, by sex, t2020_40

5. Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), EU-MIDIS II 2016, Roma; Eurostat, Labour Force Survey (LFS) 2015, General population.

6. OECD, Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) [table I.3.10b and I.3.10c]. Note: Science-related occupations are defined based on ISCO-08 codes. They consists four groups of jobs: science and engineering professionals; health professionals; ICT professionals; and science technicians and associate professionals (OECD, 2016).

7. Women in Science database, SHE FIGURES 2015. Notes: Exceptions to the reference year: BE (FR), BG, CZ, CY, NL: 2013; SI: 2010; Data unavailable for: IE, ES, MT and UK. Proportion for LU is based on a low headcount (only one university); Proportions for BE, CY and EE are based on fewer than 10 heads of universities.

Footnotes:

1. Eurobarometer 89.2, (2018). Available here

2. EIGE, 2018. Gender, youth and digitalisation: opportunities and risks.

3. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, ISOC [isoc_ci_ac_i], related to activities in the past three months. Note: Percentages are calculated over all individuals.

4. EIGE, Gender Statistics Database, Women and men in decision-making, 2018, available here

5. EIGE, Gender Statistics Database, Women and men in decision-making, 2018, available here

Footnotes:

1. Source: PISA. ICT familiarity, Note: Data is missing for CY, FR, MT, RO. The figure refers to activities performed outside of school.

2. Source: PISA. ICT familiarity, Note: Data is missing for CY, FR, MT, RO. The figure refers to activities performed outside of school.

3. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, ISOC [isoc_ci_ac_i]. Note: Percentages are calculated over all individuals in the respective age groups; * refers to 2016 data. Note: Data is missing for CY, FR, MT, RO. The figure refers to activities performed outside of school.)

4. Special Eurobarometer 452, 2016. Available here 

5. EIGE, Gender Statistics Database, Presidents of media outlet (2018). Available here 

6. EIGE, Gender Statistics Database, CEOs (2018). Available here

7. EIGE, Gender Statistics Database, Members of board (2018). Available here

8. EIGE’s calculation, Eurostat, Graduates of journalism (2016), educ_uoe_grad02. Available  here