Online discussion on gender statistics for policy-makers

23 May '17 Tue 11:00
24 May '17 Wed 00:59
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Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

I've not found how to choose option to view data over time

Vytaute Vailionyte

Select the option 'Line chart' to view the data for your selected country over time.

Andrew Smith's picture

Thanks for the explaination on the breakdown diagram! I think I just had too many variables selected.

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

All I've found is the timeline bar below (discussed earlier)

Irina Ulcica

Could you please send us a link to the indicator which you are currently viewing so that we can check this option for you?

Ligia Nobrega

You should be able to find it next to the title of the indicator.

Irina Ulcica's picture

Which type of data presentation (chart, table) was most user-friendly to you?

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

Vytaute Vailionyte - ah! I was looking for an option matching the instruction, not a type of chart! OK.

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

I think the different presentations are all user friendly (except the breakdown chart, which needs more explanation although it is perhaps the most visually striking AND shows several responses together - which I like more) - but for different uses, different audiences.

Irina Ulcica's picture

Thank you very much for all of your feedback. Now that you have had the opportunity to explore the dataset in more depth, are there any additional areas of decision making which are missing and could be considered for data collection and included in the database?

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

I'd like to thank Frank Elbers for the link to IMAGES - that will also be useful & I've bookmarked it

Natália Juráková's picture

Selecting the data for 2010-2015 was not very user friendly for me. After clicking on current year it still remained in the list of choices. I was confused and I did not know, if I chose it or not. I ended up clicking on items over again. I would prefer if selected items were not a part of list of choices. Reagarding presentation of data- it depends, but I prefer barchart.

Karolina Jakubowska

Thank you Natalia. Just to better understand, did you change type of the chart after choosing the year and the years you previously unselected reappeared?

Sarah Simpson's picture

Sarah Simpson, hello all sorry I could not join you till now. I went online early this morning and followed some of the exercises but called away to other meetings and business. Just to say that I find the system relatively easy to use but need to read through today's discussions re any questions I have that might have been answered. Re the session for the first part of this afternoon I am really excited by the EIGE's Gender Statistics Database - I can use it quite a lot and it saves me trawling through Eurostat initially because you have everything in one place plus placeholders for other topics that interest me. THANK YOU EIGE! Also thank you for holding this seminar and sorry for not taking full advantage of today. I hope to participate more fully in future sessions, and will read through today's exchange and play some more with the system. Sarah, EquiACT

Ligia Nobrega

Very welcome Sarah! And thank you for the positive feed-back.
The discussion shall still be open at least until tomorrow. It would be very useful for us if you could go through the proposed tasks and share with us any difficulties you might have faced.

Frank Elbers's picture

Perhaps data on small businesses could be included in the "Business and finance" sub-theme of the Power and decision making theme? Small businesses are often vibrant and large parts of economies in and outside of the EU and it could be interesting to see how policies aimed at equal pay and gender equality play out in this sector?

Irina Ulcica

Thank you for your suggestion Frank. We currently have some data on leaders of companies and small enterprises which can be found here - http://bit.ly/2rgbTYN

Do you think that this data would be sufficient?

Ligia Nobrega

Many thanks Frank! The current data collection on Women and men in decision making covers `Largest publicly quoted companies` which are the "largest" companies taken to be the members (max.50) of the primary blue-chip index. It is certainly a good suggestion to go also for small business where the gender aspect is also certainly quite striking.

Frank Elbers's picture

National and regional chambers of commerce could be good sources of this type of data on small enterprises.

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

Maris Goldmanis Tue, 23/05/2017 - 12:52 - that "customizable, multidimensional tabular views of datasets" sounds great! And yes, even datasets from a same organisation can mix types - without being clear about it!!

Vytaute Vailionyte Tue, 23/05/2017 - 12:10 - It would be more in line with "gender database" if those data on GBV are included! At present, VAW & GBV are being used interchangeably, which leads to a real gender discrimination - and an invisibility of a problem which really does need light thrown upon it.
And from an advocacy point of view, one can mobilise more male support for gender policies related to GBV when men are brought to identify with the issues arising from gender dimensions.

I realise that at present the EU is not really differentiating between (S)GBV & VAW - which in fact is even more reason for trying to get a complete gender-sensitive picture of violence!

Irina Ulcica

In the upcoming months we will be focusing on developing this part of the database further, so we will include your suggestion when developing this.

Vytaute Vailionyte

Dear Evelyn, these data will be included, once it's available. For you information, EIGE's Gender Statistics Database also provides data on gender-based violence from each Member State's administrative sources. However, these data are not displayed in the graphs as other types of data. This data is presented in a separate MS Excel file for each country. The reason of this is that the existing data (based on administrative data in individual Member States) suffer from a series of problems (such as differences in the legal and operational definitions of the crimes and the methodologies used in recording their prevalence), which make comparisons between countries impossible. You can find those excel files with data on gender-based violence from each Member State's administrative sources under the metadata of the indicator ‘Gender-based violence data from administrative sources at the national level’. Here is the link: http://eige.europa.eu/gender-statistics/dgs/indicator/ta_gbv_prev_form_s... Each file contains the available prevalence information for rape, sexual assault, other sexual offences, intimate-partner violence (IPV), and homicide, as well as the definitions of these crimes in the respective Member State.

Sarah Simpson's picture

Thanks Ligia and Karolina, I will do that - go through remaining tasks and see any difficulties.

Sarah Simpson's picture

I agree Frank, especially as we want to better understand how the world of free lance, consultancy, small business is working from a gender perspective and how the taxation systems in different countries enable this, if they are gender blind or potentially discriminatory because of how they are structured and or when they were last reformed. And also agree national and regional chambers of commerce are likely to be good sources of data plus potentially innovative.

Ligia Nobrega

Thank you so much for these insights Sarah and for stressing the major need of mainstreaming a gender perspective into the money domain.

Karolina Jakubowska's picture

Thank you very much for everyone's active participation and extremely fruitful discussions! We have now completed our sessions for today. Are there any other questions/comments/suggestions you would like to raise in connection to EIGE’s Gender Statistics Database?

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

Can we send other points? I need to go back through the full discussions, too!
I see replies that came in after the discussion moved on, & there are points I'd like to pick up on!

Small enterprises is certainly an area of interest. And related - public and private sector employment. I've not explored this within EIGE, but have observed in a number of countries that women tend to be found more than men in public sector work - and increasingly in higher positions, too. Whereas in private sector, fewer women make top management posts. This pattern impacts on gender gaps in pay. Public sector pay is usually equal for women & men in equal positions - relatively smaller overall gender gaps there reflect male dominance in top senior posts. But the relative equality in pay there concerns relatively low salaries compared to private sector. When one looks at public & private together, the gender pay gap is far greater. So data that allows one to tease out the private/public differences would strengthen discussion on gender pay gaps.

Alexia Zalaf's picture

Thank you for the session. Good afternoon to everyone

Irina Ulcica's picture

@Evelyn Bazalgette, @Sarah Simpson and others, the page will remain open for the rest of the day if you would like to post any additional comments. We will summarise all your suggestions and comments concerning the database in a detailed summary report which will be uploaded to EuroGender platform.

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

Is it possible to get the full transcript? There are many replies that went in later & are worth reading!

Thank you for a very interesting discussion

Irina Ulcica

You will be able to access the full transcript by scrolling to the top of the page and selecting the option 'Load all replies'. We will also provide the final PDF transcript in the next few days on this platform. Thank you very much for taking the time to participate in our discussion today and for raising such valuable points!

Ligia Nobrega

Ususally every online discussion makes available the transcript. We will make sure that this will be done for the current one as well.

Frank Elbers's picture

Thank you everyone for a very interesting discussion and day!

Karolina Jakubowska's picture

Thank you for joining us. If you would like to give us feedback regarding this online discussion please fill-in a short survey available here: http://europa.eu/!kb48MF

Karolina Jakubowska's picture

Thank you once again for your participation and your invaluable comments. There will be more opportunities for us to meet in this space to discuss the database further.

Irina Ulcica's picture

Thank you very much again and have a nice rest of the day!

Alexandrina Satnoianu's picture

Tomorrow will be uploading the transcript of the online discussion and in a couple of weeks the analytical report.

If you wish to remain connected to EIGE's Gender Statistics Database & contribute to its development, request to become members to the Workspace for EIGE's Gender Statistics Database here.

Vytaute Vailionyte's picture

Thank you so much for joining us today! Your insights and recommendations are valuable input for us in order to keep EIGE's Gender Statistics Database an up-to-date, useful and relevant tool for its users. Have a nice evening everyone!

Sarah Simpson's picture

Thanks Alexandrina, that is wonderful. Thank you all. Sarah

Ligia Nobrega's picture

Thank you everybody for the very insightful comments and great contribution provided. It was with great pleasure that we shared this discussion with such an interesting group. As you are aware, EIGE is committed on keeping the relevance of its database which requires improvement and adjustments to emerging needs on an ongoing basis. Without this constant dialogue, none of this would be possible

Evelyn Bazalgette's picture

Thank you - there are some interesting and valuable comments (some in replies later, which I only saw when scrolling back). And thank you for the opportunity to benefit from this session.

Aap Toming's picture

Hello! Nice to see all these posts, I hope I can add some valuable information of my own.

I seem to be very late to the discussion. I just wanted to share a lecture in which an esteemed professor summarizes some gender statistics and differences between men and women.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSXEHsYf8uQ

I am hoping that this information will aid policy makers who come up with different ways to teach boys and girls in our education system since it's clear that boys seem to want a more kinetic and competition orieanted approach. This is especially important since boys and young men have been falling behind women education wise for dozens of years and there has been no effort to make changes to the education system for this disparity to be fixed.

Different career choices between the sexes aren't a social construct but instead something biological as evidenced by Nordic countries where egalitarian principles have been enforced for a long time and has resulted in more women choosing professions classically associated with feminine traits and more men going for what is considered classically masculine. It would seem that if you remove all social pressures for the sexes to choose one profession or another, the biological differences between men and women actually magnify (since there are no other variables) and you have a society that is more divided than before. A paradox of equality policies.